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I'm not so sure the PSVR 2 will succeed, and may fall short like the first one. (PSVR2+PS5 may potentially cost $1,040 with two games)

And with a 5M user base on 117M PS4s that's why you'll get $20 demo kinds of games and not AAA games.

PSVR2 isn't even compatible with PS4, so with around 25M PS5s sold, you'll get a fraction of gamers buying in.

What i find interesting about this is that even back when Sony used to report on PSVR headset sales, they never gave numbers for the best selling software.

In October 2021 less than a year ago, they did give us the top 5 "most played" PSVR titles.

  • Rec Room (2017)
  • Beat Saber (2018)
  • PlayStation VR Worlds (2016)
  • The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim VR (2017)
  • Resident Evil 7 biohazard (2017)

But with no numbers to go with them, it makes me wonder if software sales were too low for Sony to praise in reports.

We know that Beat Saber is the best selling VR game yet, selling 4 million copies across PC VR, PSVR, and Quest in feb 2021

https://www.roadtovr.com/beat-saber-4-million-units-milestone-revenue/

But we don't have any splits,

However, FB did announce that just on the Quest alone the game made $100 million in revenue:

https://www.androidcentral.com/beat-saber-surpasses-100-million-revenue-oculus-quest-platform

Given this, I suspect that the majority of the 4 million copies were sold on Quest followed by PC VR headsets.

It's highly probable that not a single game on that "most played" PSVR list sold over 1 million copies despite 5 million users. If that's the case, then software sales were not too good and may be why Sony rarely discussed software in relation to the PSVR, unlike software in relation to the PS4 that they gladly gave numbers on frequently.
 

01011001

Member
personally, if it costs even a cent more than 350€ I will not buy it.

if it costs more than 300€ I will be disappointed.

if it costs 250€ to 270€ I'll be positively surprised.
 
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Mercador

Member
Yeah the great thing about cellphone powered VR is you can feel the momentum of the visuals, really transports you back to 2001. Game on.
Yeah, not the best to be sure but technology move quickly as you may know. I expect a stand alone VR headset with my Oculus Rift capacities within the next 5 years.
 

01011001

Member
With the specs they announced and Oculus bouncing price increases for Quest 2? I think you have unrealistic expectations ;).

I don't.
the Quest 2 has a full SOC on board, speakers and a battery.

the PSVR2 has barely better specs and non of that.

if the PSVR2 is more expensive than the Quest 2 it's overpriced imo. for the fact alone that the Quest 2 is a fully functional VR system without additional hardware
 
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I don't.
the Quest 2 has a full SOC on board, speakers and a battery.

the PSVR2 has barely better specs and non of that.

if the PSVR2 is more expensive than the Quest 2 it's overpriced imo

The built material will likely cost more, but an improvement over the Quest 2 even if not by much as you say, could still potentially reach a price point of $450 or $500.

The best case scenario is $400 like the Quest 2 (which can be found as low as $349) or if Sony decides to surprise us and takes the Hit, $300, but I very much doubt they will do that.
 

Crayon

Member
I don't.
the Quest 2 has a full SOC on board, speakers and a battery.

the PSVR2 has barely better specs and non of that.

if the PSVR2 is more expensive than the Quest 2 it's overpriced imo. for the fact alone that the Quest 2 is a fully functional VR system without additional hardware

You are also getting oled, eye tracking, a well-deisigned headband instead of a jock strap.
 

01011001

Member
The built material will likely cost more, but an improvement over the Quest 2 even if not by much as you say, could still potentially reach a price point of $450 or $500.

The best case scenario is $400 like the Quest 2 (which can be found as low as $349) or if Sony decides to surprise us and takes the Hit, $300, but I very much doubt they will do that.

I am not sure how much the SoC and Battery in the Quest 2 would cost on their own, but that to me should outweigh the improvements PSVR2 has over it in other ways
 

01011001

Member
You are also getting oled, eye tracking, a well-deisigned headband instead of a jock strap.

OLED is one thing that's most likely a few dollars more expensive per unit true... but eye tracking only really needs low res cameras build in.

the question is, what's more expensive,
a full SoC with battery+charging system to run it,
or OLED screens and a cameras to track your eyes
 
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MarkMe2525

Member
Anyone that believes this is smoking Walter white Blue meth

Edit——

Missed the +PS5 part. I mean that logic doesn’t make sense. Its like saying the PS5 will fail because you need a 500+ dollar tv to use it. Odds are you aren’t buying a tv to play ps5 and you aren’t buying a ps5 to play VR.
95% of households are already going to own a television regardless of if they own a game console. I'm not downplaying the potential success of the PSVR 2, I think there are at least 5-10 million hardcore gamers and tech savvy casuals that may take the plunge eventually. I will be one of them.
 
95% of households are already going to own a television regardless of if they own a game console. I'm not downplaying the potential success of the PSVR 2, I think there are at least 5-10 million hardcore gamers and tech savvy casuals that may take the plunge eventually. I will be one of them.

I mean, thats essentially what im saying though. You can’t factor in the price of a tv for playstation like you can’t factor in the price of a playstation for PSVR2. Sony aren’t selling VR to non-gamers, or people who don’t want a playstation, they are selling to their intended installbase of 100m+ users. If they wanted to sell VR to little Timmy and aunt Joyce they wouldn’t attach it to the console.

There might be some people that buy a ps5 for PSVR2 but it would likely be someone that was gonna spend money on a console eventually anyway. If 10 million or more people buy a PSVR2 and software for it they are already up, they are essentially replacing their mobile division with VR except vr will cost way more than a PSP
 
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R6Rider

Gold Member
I mean, thats essentially what im saying though. You can’t factor in the price of a tv for playstation like you can’t factor in the price of a playstation for PSVR2. Sony aren’t selling VR to non-gamers, or people who don’t want a playstation, they are selling to their intended installbase of 100m+ users. If they wanted to sell VR to little Timmy and aunt Joyce they wouldn’t attach it to the console.

There might be some people that buy a ps5 for PSVR2 but it would likely be someone that was gonna spend money on a console eventually anyway. If 10 million or more people buy a PSVR2 and software for it they are already up, they are essentially replacing their mobile division with VR except vr will cost way more than a PSP
On top of this. They have shown that PSVR players buy more software than other users. Not by just a small amount either.
 

Three

Member
It may not do well initially, but early rumors suggest that "Playstation VR 2" will be turned into a major motion picture aiming for a release in 2026 simultaneously in theaters and on Netflix.

No word yet on how this makes any sense in terms of plot or entertainment value. Stay tuned.
Ready Player 1 2
 
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Crayon

Member
Don't forget the sense controllers with adaptive triggers and the haptics in the headset.

3D audio too.

That's right the controllers. The 3d audio is a feature that the headset can use, but it's built into the ps5 itself, so you aren't paying for that in the headset. Or sony isn't, I should say.

at's most likely a few dollars more expensive per unit true... but eye tracking only really needs low res cameras build in.

the question is, what's more expensive,
a full SoC with battery+charging system to run it,
or OLED screens and a cameras

Idk. Oled+eye cameras+motorized controllers+proper headmount or a cell phone? There's really no way to tell. All major features and maybe the real question is what's worth more at retail.

It's all an aside without knowing what games are going to come out for psvr2. We should know by now that's the biggest part of the equiation.
 
Interesting. Sony is seemingly all about big budget games and profit, yet they are investing into VR again. I don’t know about this or fully understand the reason, but whatever. Maybe it did better than we think or they still see potential hidden somewhere in it. One thing is for sure is they definitely need better quality software for it if they want it to appeal to more people especially at it’s presumably high price.
 
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Three

Member
Interesting. Sony is seemingly all about big budget games and profit, yet they are investing into VR again. I don’t know about this or fully understand the reason, but whatever. Maybe it did better than we think or they still see potential hidden somewhere in it. One thing is for sure is they definitely need better quality software for it if they want it to appeal to more people especially at it’s presumably high price.
I think sales would be slow but game support better. That's all I care about. We are in a phase where a lot of games aim for 60/120fps modes and adding VR to those type of games would be less troublesome than the gen where the install base started weak. I suspect continued VR support for Ace Combat, GT, RE4 remake, Astrobot, etc.
 
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Crayon

Member
Interesting. Sony is seemingly all about big budget games and profit, yet they are investing into VR again. I don’t know about this or fully understand the reason, but whatever. Maybe it did better than we think or they still see potential hidden somewhere in it. One thing is for sure is they definitely need better quality software for it if they want it to appeal to more people especially at it’s presumably high price.

Most companies are quite interested in profit. Sony's roots are still a hardware and gadget company. Seems natural enough to me that they want to get in on vr early.
 

DaGwaphics

Member
I'm confused as to why Quest owners would upgrade to a different headset entirely, especially if we are talking wired. They could easily get a cable and use the headset they have on a PC if tethering isn't a problem.
 

Crayon

Member
I'm confused as to why Quest owners would upgrade to a different headset entirely, especially if we are talking wired. They could easily get a cable and use the headset they have on a PC if tethering isn't a problem.

It would be a game or three they want but can't get on quest. If good games come, people with and without quests will buy. If good games don't, it will sell poorly.
 

Crayon

Member
As always. I actually have a PSVR sitting around in the box, barely ever used it. The software has a long way to go.

That's really the thing. Smaller games were good when vr was new. It was understandable for a lot of reasons. Lack of high-end games for expensive vr sets has been looming larger and larger, though. Alyx really put a point on it by being the exception to the rule.

For big full games on psvr, I've got like idk.... 5? Walking dead, skyrim, dirt rally, i forget the name of the bank heist one, nms.... uh.... maybe wipeout omega if you count that? Start wars squadrons? That's not alot for several years. There's a lot more smaller games that have been great and not to take away from those, but sony better bring more because that's what everyone is expecting out of a high end headset and a ps5 at this point.

The real tricky thing is that it's basically down to sony. There is nothing to port except alyx. So they better follow through with the plan to have good vr modes in the marquee games because that's really the only way I can think of to keep exciting, system-selling software coming out.
 

The_Mike

Member
You won't get far questioning VR/PSVR here on Gaf.

But I agree. Has always said vr is niche and will always be.

The price point is too big for the average consumer. And the interest is just not that big outside the hardcore crowd.

Also the only real good game you hear about is still HL Alyx
 
I mean, thats essentially what im saying though. You can’t factor in the price of a tv for playstation like you can’t factor in the price of a playstation for PSVR2.

Except you can because you NEED a PS5 to use PSVR. Even for those who already have a PS5, they have to spend $100 less or the same price, or more to use PSVR, who knows where the price will fall on.

Sony aren’t selling VR to non-gamers, or people who don’t want a playstation,

That's exactly what they were doing with the first one, which is why they had their hired demonstrators try and push to get as many non-tech savy people to try one. Sony wasn't trying to be a niche with the original PSVR, they were trying to get ahead of everyone else thinking it was going to blow up at some point just like the other VR makers. They even gave away goodie bags, pens, shirts and other stuff to try and get random shopper to consider or buy a PSVR (and PS5 if they didn't have one) before walking out the door.

Interesting. Sony is seemingly all about big budget games and profit, yet they are investing into VR again. I don’t know about this or fully understand the reason, but whatever. Maybe it did better than we think or they still see potential hidden somewhere in it. One thing is for sure is they definitely need better quality software for it if they want it to appeal to more people especially at it’s presumably high price.

The issue is that if they put more focus on VR development than last time, what will become of their traditional PS5 game output? They can't rely on hybrid titles, if they do that it will make gamers think the PSVR2 is a gimmick instead of something worth buying and they'll just play the game without VR. We saw this happen with the first PSVR and the PS-Move on the PS3.

On top of this. They have shown that PSVR players buy more software than other users.

Other users of what? VR users?
 

Fafalada

Fafracer forever
Fast forward and VR headset sales have been dominated by one company and their Quest series of headsets. The Quest 2 has already sold over 10 million devices in two years, while Sony with costly marketing, demonstrations, software deals, and internal push only sold 5 million in six years. PSVR is still costing you $350 if you have a PS4, or a low of $650 if you don't have a PS4 and buy one new.
You are stating this like Quest (or anything oculus) was some organic success. Meta pushed their headsets harder than anyone, or likely harder than the rest of the market combined, especially when it comes to pouring money down the drain for software. When it comes to funding exclusives on either platform, numbers aren't even close.

Which, yea is stating the obvious, this isn't an easy market to create, but we get to have fun with them trying, who wouldn't welcome more attempts?

Other users of what?
Flat screen devices. VR has higher attach rates, across the board, but with market so small, noone knows how long that will hold.
 

Crayon

Member
You are stating this like Quest (or anything oculus) was some organic success. Meta pushed their headsets harder than anyone, or likely harder than the rest of the market combined, especially when it comes to pouring money down the drain for software. When it comes to funding exclusives on either platform, numbers aren't even close.

Sony gave out pens, tho.
 
You are stating this like Quest (or anything oculus) was some organic success. Meta pushed their headsets harder than anyone, or likely harder than the rest of the market combined, especially when it comes to pouring money down the drain for software. When it comes to funding exclusives on either platform, numbers aren't even close.

Sony was the biggest player in terms of putting in actual effort in marketing and pushing software for VR until 2019. Oculus or Oculus powered devices were already far ahead of Sony before the renewed push and the Quest 2 success. This sudden burst of interest for The quest 2 headsets came out of nowhere.

Flat screen devices. VR has higher attach rates, across the board, but with market so small, noone knows how long that will hold.

I don't know if that statistic alone is useful, if the general attach rate is high but actual VR software sales are low, that doesn't seem like a big deal.
 
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Fafalada

Fafracer forever
Sony was the biggest player in terms of putting in actual effort in marketing and pushing software for VR until 2019.
I have first hand insights into how each of them handled exclusives - let's just say that Oculus/Meta was - considerably more, generous.

Oculus or Oculus powered devices were already far ahead of Sony before the renewed push and the Quest 2 success. This sudden burst of interest for The quest 2 headsets came out of nowhere.
Rift series was distant third for first few years on the market, it wasn't even a competition until they shifted focus to low-cost units.
And I wouldn't say Quest 2 rise came out of nowhere at all - the interest really grew when VR finally got its first true system-seller (Beat Saber), and Meta capitalized on that in the smartest way possible at the time, and kept going from there.

I don't know if that statistic alone is useful, if the general attach rate is high but actual VR software sales are low, that doesn't seem like a big deal.
Like I said - we just don't know at this point.
If engagement stayed that high as userbase grows, that would definitely leave a mark, but we won't know until/if it does.
It's not unheard of for small-userbases to be 'more dedicated' simply because they're more niche, and they normalize when they expand, but on the flipside, VR is a new medium and expecting it must/will conform to console-patterns is also not guaranteed by any stretch.
 

Reallink

Member
Yeah, not the best to be sure but technology move quickly as you may know. I expect a stand alone VR headset with my Oculus Rift capacities within the next 5 years.

Problem is mobile hardware will always be at least a decade behind desktops and consoles. By the time Quest 6 reaches some approximation a PS5 (itself presently quite underpowered)--never mind a contemporary gaming PC--8090Ti's will be flirting with a Petaflop of performance approaching genuine photorealism with RT lighting systems simulating 1000's of ray bounces, unlimited geometry, and dozens of materials layers for the most inconsequential objects.
 
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Most companies are quite interested in profit. Sony's roots are still a hardware and gadget company. Seems natural enough to me that they want to get in on vr early.
Exactly which is why I wonder why they want to jump back into VR which didn’t seem to make them much money even with the huge PS4 user base. Then again like you said, they probably want to try again while the tech is still early and developing.
 

metaverse

Member
You forgot to add the cost of the TV if you buy PS5 without a PSVR2.

Don't forget the cost of electricity. Additionally, I doubt Sony will provide food to sustain the organism wearing the PSVR2. Greedy bastards.
 
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And I wouldn't say Quest 2 rise came out of nowhere at all - the interest really grew when VR finally got its first true system-seller (Beat Saber)

Beat Saber came out in 2016 with a full windows launch in 2019 at the time Quest 1 came out. The sudden interest in beat Saber happened some time after Quest 2 came out which was already selling millions, and then helped sales even further. In less than 2 years Quest 2 is passing 15 million devices sold, it's the definition of sudden appeal out of nowhere.

This is especially true when you don't see any significant sales increases for other headsets other than the early release hype for the Valve Index which was a blip. If VR was getting more popular in general we would have seen indications of bigger sales jumps for other head sets and that didn't happen for most of them.

Most of the VR sales have consolidated around Quest 2.
 
Exactly which is why I wonder why they want to jump back into VR which didn’t seem to make them much money even with the huge PS4 user base. Then again like you said, they probably want to try again while the tech is still early and developing.

The profit margins have to be very low if they only cut $50 from the price in six years. PS4 never got an official price cut below $299 either. PSVR2 will be more costly, they must have already been spending a lot of money on it to want to jump in again, they really want to try and get ahead of the others, but looking at Quest 2 it may be too late for a VR headset following the console add-on model to succeed in a way standalone VR headsets can.

With Sony's new push into PC gaming, you'd think they would just make a PC compatible PSVR that would work on PS5's and PC's, but they are going for a closed garden strategy again.
 

Mercador

Member
Problem is mobile hardware will always be at least a decade behind desktops and consoles. By the time Quest 6 reaches some approximation a PS5 (itself presently quite underpowered)--never mind a contemporary gaming PC--8090Ti's will be flirting with a Petaflop of performance approaching genuine photorealism with RT lighting systems simulating 1000's of ray bounces, unlimited geometry, and dozens of materials layers for the most inconsequential objects.
You are probably right but ease of use is quite important as well, moreover with non-tech people and I'm pretty sure Meta (and the like and future competitors) will aim mainly for that crowd, not ours.
 

Fafalada

Fafracer forever
Beat Saber came out in 2016 with a full windows launch in 2019 at the time Quest 1 came out. The sudden interest in beat Saber happened some time after Quest 2 came out
Not from where I was looking - Beat Saber sold 1M before it even came out of Early Access, and it was telegraphed to be a massive hit in the making in the right hands.
Quest just happened to be by far the best platform for it (the timing was almost too perfect too), and they elevated each-other so to speak. It's like Just Dance games on Nintendo platforms vs. everywhere else, they are popular in general, they really hit home on Nintendo consoles.
There may be other growth factors for Quest 2 'now' - but frankly it's kind of moot.

If VR was getting more popular in general we would have seen indications of bigger sales jumps for other head sets and that didn't happen for most of them.
We have decades of precedent for this not being the case. PS1 doubled the size of console market prior - and it didn't come with associated growth in competition.
PS2 blew up even bigger and the competition remained stagnant from gen prior.
Hell - Wii popularity did nothing to grow the rest of consoles either, even though general population clearly embraced gaming more than ever.

Most of the VR sales have consolidated around Quest 2.
No argument about that - but that's not an uncommon phenomenon (see above).
 

MarkMe2525

Member
I mean, thats essentially what im saying though. You can’t factor in the price of a tv for playstation like you can’t factor in the price of a playstation for PSVR2. Sony aren’t selling VR to non-gamers, or people who don’t want a playstation, they are selling to their intended installbase of 100m+ users. If they wanted to sell VR to little Timmy and aunt Joyce they wouldn’t attach it to the console.

There might be some people that buy a ps5 for PSVR2 but it would likely be someone that was gonna spend money on a console eventually anyway. If 10 million or more people buy a PSVR2 and software for it they are already up, they are essentially replacing their mobile division with VR except vr will cost way more than a PSP
I hear you, but I think that's what OP's point was. The OP compares the sales of PSVR 1 to the sales of the quest to demonstrate how the hurdles of ownership (he focuses on price) will keep it from being a mass market success. I personally don't believe that Sony necessarily defines "success" as becoming the vr market leader so I think the OP's opinion is missguided, if that's what the OP is inferring at all.

I'm not disagreeing with you per day, I just don't think your analogy worked in the context of how the OP framed their argument as tv ownership is so high.
 

JLB

Member
Yeah, its going to be a niche product. By niche I mean it will sell a couple of millions, but not enough (like with the rest of VR devices with the exception of Quest) to do AAA like investments.
 
I think everyone knows, it’s gona flop, hope they don’t drop it tho, we are few iterations away from mass market, psvr4 is where it’s going to take off
 

drezz

Member
PSVR 2 still needs to be chained to a console to work?
It will out a doubt be spoofed as a Quest 2 on PC within 24hours of release.

Will the cool triggers act accordingly?
No.
Controller Vibration?
No, just default like duelsense does when mimic a DS4.
Head Vibration?
None.

Will it work on pc?
Yes
Without a doubt.
 

DenchDeckard

Gold Member
To be a success it needs to do better than psvr 1 because no dev will put any effort into games that require better graphics than a ps4 and increased dev time for less return.

Unless Sony is going to throw buckets of cash at developers to secure games that is.

I think half life Alyx is a guaranteed game as it will have the launch hype...but we will need to see how it goes after that.

With all the issues with manufacturing I can't imagine trying to build a console that's in high demand and an expensive VR headset as well. I'm interested to see how Sony navigates this.
 
Sony introduced the Playstation Virtual Reality headset in September 2015, with a launch date expected for the first half of 2016. For some unknown reason, a delay occurred and the new hardware's release date was changed to October

When the PSVR released the cost for the device was set at $400, during this time the PS4, the console you needed to buy to use PSVR, cost $299 which coincided with the release of the PS4 Slim, just before PSVR's release date. Therefore, if you wanted PSVR but did not already have a PS4, you would have had to pay a premium of $700 ($800 if waited for the PS4 Pro) for both devices before any software purchases. If you had a PS4 you had to pay $400, the price the PS4 originally retailed for at launch.

Today, PSVR's base price is still $349, and the PS4 (slim) still costs $299. 6 years later if you want the PSVR experience you need to fork out $650, only a $50 discount from October 2016. The PS4 Pro which provides the best performance for VR, if you can find it, is still being sold officially at the same price point when it launched, $399. This means that if you choose to purchase a PS4 Pro you will need to fork out $750 for the PSVR experience, only $50 in savings. In theory, but in practice with inflation, you are paying $10 more than the 2016 prices, so you aren't saving any money at all and are now paying more for the PS4+PSVR than you would have 6 years ago in 2016.

Since the PSVR launched it has sold only 5 million units. Sony had pushed PSVR hard, even pulled a Microsoft Kinect and sent some of their studios to die on the platform such as Evolution Studios. Sony went to numerous 3p developers to make software for the PSVR, spent heavily on the marketing campaign, and set-up events across thousands of retail stores in US hiring demonstrators, so people could try out PSVR while they shop.

PSVR was essentially a failure. Sony's refusal to make the device more affordable shows that it wasn't generating profits, many companies that had promised to release VR headsets
or were working on them pulled out, including Sony's direct competitor Microsoft. The best selling VR back then was a Samsung Headset that was originally rushed to market and provided a compromised experience, and there were so many other companies releasing headsets and demoing them to customers that major retailers were viewing VR as a fad, and the worst part is they may not have been wrong then.

Fast forward and VR headset sales have been dominated by one company and their Quest series of headsets. The Quest 2 has already sold over 10 million devices in two years, while Sony with costly marketing, demonstrations, software deals, and internal push only sold 5 million in six years. PSVR is still costing you $350 if you have a PS4, or a low of $650 if you don't have a PS4 and buy one new.

It's obvious that Sony wanted the PSVR to be a driver for hardware sales, but this didn't happen, and I don't see how the PSVR 2 could rectify that. it will cost either the same price or more than the original at it's 2016 release, it will be compatible with the PS5 which is $200 more expensive than the PS4 slim was at the release of the original PSVR, and it's going to split Sony's first party output, which has already been hampered by delays, internal staff changes, and higher costs.

Out of 117 million PS4's sold, 5 million PSVR headsets means only 4.5% of owners used PSVR in six years. In less than 2 1/2 years PSVR sold 4.2 million units, this means that the majority of PSVR sales were front loaded and Sony hasn't reported on sales figures since announcing passing 5 million in 2020. A person who is known as Zhuge ex on the Reeeset forum claims it sold 6 million, but that number was never given by Sony, so it's up to you if you want to accept that claim, but it doesn't really change the percentage much, it just bumps it to a bit over 5% instead of 4.5%.

I do not see any benefit to PSVR 2 for Sony, I only see this having consequences for Sonys internal development, costs, and their traditional release output. Microsoft still has no interest in entering the VR field with Series X, and with the Xbox Series consoles being more competitive this gen, there will be less of an audience to sell PSVR 2 to, unlike with Xbox One vs. PS4. The original PSVR wasn't selling many PS4's off the shelves, so I doubt the PSVR 2 will for PS5's.

Assuming the PSVR2 releases at the same price as the original at $400, will consumers buy a PS5+PSVR2 combo for $900 with the disc based PS5 or $800 with the digital PS5? Don't forget that Sony games trend at $70 each, and you have to buy those with your VR headset separately.

This means a PSVR2+PS5 combo and two games would cost someone $1040 BEFORE tax. That's the price of a dead man walking.

Unless they have a surprise $200 price cut for the PS5, and Sony decides it's going to go Hulk Hogan on Xbox taking that loss PS3 style, and releasing PSVR 2 at $299 to add salt in the wound, selling millions of PSVR 2's into bankruptcy, most people aren't going to buy this.

Even the early adopters, the most hardcore of the hardcore gamers, are going to be contemplating a PC VR headset at a price that high. The Quest 2 has sold over 10 million devices and is priced for mass appeal for as low as $350. For the hardcore with good PC's, the Valve Index is $999, HP G2 is $600 but can be found at a discount, Vive Pro 2 $700, and the older PC VR headsets from years ago that were already much more powerful than PSVR, are now $500 or less new/used. That $1040 pre-tax price point for the PS5+PSVR2 doesn't appeal to casuals or the hardcore.

Keep in mind all these prices are making the assumption that it will cost the same as the original at $400, there's a strong chance that it may actually release at a higher price. I can't see how this can possibly succeed, even if the goal was only to do better than the original PSVR, I can't see 5 million PSVR 2's selling unless Sony is willing to cut its own throat to do it.

<>
New update


If it will be coming in early 2023, that means likely before may and they don't think it's ready for holiday sales. That gives us a hint that there's a high probability the PSVR 2 will not match the PSVR 1;s price of $400, and instead may cost even more. But even if they do decide to match the average consumer will have no choice but to pay $900 for a PSVR2+PS5. The average consumer will likely just buy a PS5, and then reject an additional $400 premium. The original PSVR is still $349, combined with a $300 PS4 brings total spend to $650, only $250 in savings not counting the increased game prices. I feel these prices are still too high for an increase in consumer adoption, even just over the original PSVR.
All I see is that these prices you are listing are still cheaper then buying a pc and vr set capable of the same performance.
All Sony needs to do is to make their new VR Headset and controllers compatible with PCs and PC Games.
 

thebigmanjosh

Gold Member
In 2020 I heard from a friend at PS that they considered PSVR1 to be a flop/failure internally. The fact Sony is going all in with PSVR2 makes me believe they're confident enough in the market and software potential, but we'll see how it actually plays out.
 
The biggest deterrent to PSVR2 and VR gaming in general is paying hundreds of dollars to look like this...

virtual reality vr GIF
cartoon network time GIF by Doctor Popular
Virtual Reality Vr GIF by Damiano Mansi


While playing games that look like this...

GIF by Giphy QA
On Fire Cooking GIF by Xbox
Happy Ready At Dawn GIF by Echo Games VR
Why do you worry how you look like while playing?
 
Not from where I was looking - Beat Saber sold 1M before it even came out of Early Access, and it was telegraphed to be a massive hit in the making in the right hands.

Beat Saber didn't reach 2 million until after Quest 2 came out, then it started selling on Quest 2 and PC VR quickly, then PSVR, reaching 4 million copies. All of this came out of nowhere, Quest 2 was not telegraphed to help move software that well or to sell as many units as it has.

If it can also work with PC I'll likely pick it up. It'd be a nice upgrade from my CV1.
If not, probably not.

There will be a Jim Ryan thread here, 5 of them, every day for weeks if PSVR 2 works on PC.
 
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