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Of the current consoles, which had the best reveal?

Jubenhimer

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The three main gaming platforms on the market right now are PlayStation 5, Xbox Series S|X, and the Nintendo Switch. The reveals for these consoles have been met with loads of hype and speculation leading up to their launches, and each has gone on to break sales records and are building up sizable libraries.

Nintendo Switch

Being the first of the three release, the Nintendo Switch had the most mystery surrounding it prior to reveal. For about 2 years, nobody knew what the then codenamed "NX" was even supposed to be. A handheld? A home console? Both? What everyone did know was that at the time, Nintendo Co. Ltd. was in desperate need of new hardware, and fast. The Wii U had ultimately failed to be a worthwhile investment for most people, and the Nintendo 3DS while still being popular with younger gamers, was starting to show its age. Then right at the buzzer, Nintendo released the trailer for the now renamed "Nintendo Switch" on YouTube in October 2016. The device ultimately ended up being door number 3, a tablet/home console hybrid that is more Game Boy player than PlayStation 4 killer.

Nintendo then went all out with its formal reveal in January 2017. A live-stage presentation that detailed the release date, price, hardware features, and software lineup. In typical Nintendo fashion, they focused less on raw technical specs, and more on how it stands out from other gaming devices. After showing off what the console's new detachable Joy-Con controllers are capable of, which include an IR motion camera and new HD Rumble technology, Nintendo went right into the games, starting with two new original titles designed to show off the console's new tech. The first, 1-2 Switch, a screen-less party game ala John Sabastian's Joust. where each player takes a Joy-Con controller, and mimics actions without the use of a screen. The game was a neat novelty that showcased the Joy-Con's Wii-style motion controls, and the Switch's out-of-the-box portable multiplayer. But at $50 and not packed-in with the system, the asking price considered too steep. The other new title shown off was much more appealing in ARMS. A fighting game that's a cross between Nintendo's own Punch-Out!! and Sega's Virtual-On series, the game used the Joy-Con to mimic a pair of stretchy boxing gloves as players dodge around the arena. While ARMS didn't arrive in time for the Switch's launch, it ultimately ended up being well received, selling over 2 million copies worldwide.

More games were shown off including the sequel to the Wii U's surprise hit, Splatoon, named Splatoon 2, a visual and mechanical improvement over the original in just about every way. Super Mario Odyssey, the latest in the 3D Super Mario series that took the series back to its sandbox roots. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 from Monolith Soft, and Fire Emblem Warriors. Nintendo then moved on to third party titles, including appearances from Sega, Suda 51, Square Enix, and EA, all promising to deliver games to the platform. Nintendo then closed the show by revealing that the highly anticipated Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild will arrive at launch for the new console.

The reception to the reveal was met with mixed reception by gamers. While many hands-on impressions praised the Switch's tech and features, the live presentation, odd software choices, limited third party commitment, and the higher than expected asking price of $300, made everyone skeptical of its success. With the Switch being a clean break for Nintendo, and the company coming off its biggest failure in years, many were unsure about the success of the Switch. But over 85 million units and a library of over 2,000 titles later, The Switch ultimately ended up being a popular and well received platform with a rich selection of games. While it has its hardware flaws *Joy-Con drift*, the Switch still remains one of gaming's most popular platforms with gamers and developers.

Xbox Series S|X

Microsoft Corp. similarly to Nintendo, has had a rough generation. While the Xbox One wasn't quite a failure like the Wii U, the botched pre-launch and lack of killer exclusive titles led to it trailing behind the PlayStation 4 in sales and support by a considerable margin. Microsoft hoped to fix that going into the next generation. Initially going by Project Scarlett, the next Xbox generation was finally shown off at The Game Awards in 2019. The new gen's flagship, is the Xbox Series X, a console that Microsoft claims to be the most powerful machine on the market, featuring Microsoft's Velocity architecture, and an SSD, allowing for quicker load times in games. The very first game revealed, was a sequel to Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, a move that followed Microsoft's acquisition of Ninja Theory the year prior. As much of the world was locked down during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Microsoft opted to continue showing off the next generation in live-streamed, pre-recorded presentations broadcasted to YouTube. The first, an episode of Inside Xbox, showcased Microsoft's third party partners for next gen. Among them, was Microsoft's renewed commitment to both exclusives, and foreign developers, notably Japanese developers. New gameplay of Assasin's Creed Valhalla, Scarlet Nexus, Yakuza: Like a Dragon, and others supposedly demonstrating what the Series X is capable of.

A few months later, Microsoft held a proper reveal for Series X featuring mostly first party Xbox Game Studios titles including Halo: Infinite, Everwild, Grounded, a new Fable, and other titles. Months later, the long-rumored second console in the next gen Xbox family was revealed, the Xbox Series S. A cheaper, less powerful, all digital alternative to the Series X, the S was designed with Microsoft's Xbox Game Pass service in mind, allowing users to download games, with the trade off being no physical disc drive. While the Series S and X were well received, Microsoft's gradual reveal was ultimately seen as underwhelming. The INside Xbox episode showed basically nothing impressive, while the Xbox games showcase mostly had no gameplay. For a console touted as the most powerful thing alive, Microsoft sure didn't show it first go-around.

PlayStation 5

As the 8th generation started winding down, the 5th installment in Sony Interactive Entertainment's PlayStation home console franchise was imminent. At first, not much was known about the PlayStation 5, other than the fact that like the Series X, it'll have an SSD instead of a HDD, and would support 4K Blu-Ray. As 2020 drew closer, Sony's Mark Cerny pulled back more details on what new system was about, including the console's new controller, as well as Sony developing a custom 3D sound engine for the platform. Sony later held a special presentation in-lieu of the planned GDC conference in March 2020, in which Cerny finally pulled back the curtain on what exactly is in the new hardware. Turns out that SSD has been heavily customized with a special I/O board that not only allows for even faster load times than a standard SSD, but also allows it to directly interface with the system's GPU and CPU, allowing for new types of gameplay and design, the console's custom audio engine named Tempest, was also detailed at this presentation.

A few months later, the PS5 controller, the DualSense was revealed. Similarly to the Switch, the DualSense is designed around High-definition haptic engine that allows for specific vibrations in different parts of the controller at different volumes. The controller also comes equipped with a mic for gameplay and voice chat, as well as adaptive triggers, that change in resistance depending on in-game context. Finally in June, Sony pulled back the full veil on PS5, and they hit the ground running. Kicking off with some new titles from SIE's "PlayStation Studios" line of first party games. Marvel's Spider-Man: Miles Morales, the semi-sequel to the critically acclaimed PS4 original was the first PS5 title showcased, focusing on Miles Morales filling in for Peter Parker. Sony then moved straight to Gran Turismo 7, the first mainline entry in the racing sim series in nearly a decade. In a similar fashion to Nintendo's reveal of the Switch, Sony flexed the PS5's new tech with a mix of new IP and familiar faces. Ratchet and Clank: Rift Apart marked the duo's first return to an original game since the PS3, and was by far the best showcase of the console's custom SSD, launching Ratchet and Clank from level to level at near instant speeds. Returnal, a new title from Resogun developer Housemarque, is a roguelike shooter that utilizes the SDD to load in as many unique enemies on screen as fast as possible, while also eliminating post-death load times. Destruction All-Stars, a multiplayer brawler with driving mechanics, a remake of PS3 cult-classic Demon's Souls, Sackboy: A Big Adventure, a spin-off of Little Big Planet, Astro's Playroom, a free-pack in showcasing the new DualSense features, and Horizon: Forbidden West, the sequel to 2017's groundbreaking Horizon Zero Dawn. Sony also showed off new games from third parties including a new Square Enix title, Project Athiea, later renamed Forsaken, Hitman 3, Resident Evil 8, and a selection of indie titles including Bugsnax, and Little Inside.

Sony then closed out the show with the full reveal of the console's design. In a tech world filled with indistinguishable black boxes and rectangles, the PS5's big, curvy, and loud two-toned design was a breath of refreshing air when first shown. On top of that, the console was revealed to come in in two varieties. One with a disc drive, and one without. While no price or release date was shown, Sony had a very strong showing for their new console. But even then, it was a bit underwhelming. For a console constantly kept in the dark and hyped up to hell and back, many expected the reveals to be a bit... Bigger than what we got. Still, the sheer variety of games shown WITH proper gameplay, and strong titles on the way, the presentation fueled the hype for the new machine. Near the Holiday season, Sony ran one last hype presentation for the PS5, which detailed the games shown in the last event, as well as a few new ones including Final Fantasy XVI and God of War: Ragnarok, as well as finally revealing the launch price and release date.

Between each of these three pre-launch reveals, which console had the strongest showing?
 
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MS has the most buzz word laden PR, so they win!

And hellblade sequel reveal was excellent, they got their people all excited with the whole 12tf thing.
 
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The three main gaming platforms on the market right now are PlayStation 5, Xbox Series S|X, and the Nintendo Switch. The reveals for these consoles have been met with loads of hype and speculation leading up to their launches, and each has gone on to break sales records and are building up sizable libraries.

Nintendo Switch

Being the first of the three release, the Nintendo Switch had the most mystery surrounding it prior to reveal. For about 2 years, nobody knew what the then codenamed "NX" was even supposed to be. A handheld? A home console? Both? What everyone did know was that at the time, Nintendo Co. Ltd. was in desperate need of new hardware, and fast. The Wii U had ultimately failed to be a worthwhile investment for most people, and the Nintendo 3DS while still being popular with younger gamers, was starting to show its age. Then right at the buzzer, Nintendo released the trailer for the now renamed "Nintendo Switch" on YouTube in October 2016. The device ultimately ended up being door number 3, a tablet/home console hybrid that is more Game Boy player than PlayStation 4 killer.

Nintendo then went all out with its formal reveal in January 2017. A live-stage presentation that detailed the release date, price, hardware features, and software lineup. In typical Nintendo fashion, they focused less on raw technical specs, and more on how it stands out from other gaming devices. After showing off what the console's new detachable Joy-Con controllers are capable of, which include an IR motion camera and new HD Rumble technology, Nintendo went right into the games, starting with two new original titles designed to show off the console's new tech. The first, 1-2 Switch, a screen-less party game ala John Sabastian's Joust. where each player takes a Joy-Con controller, and mimics actions without the use of a screen. The game was a neat novelty that showcased the Joy-Con's Wii-style motion controls, and the Switch's out-of-the-box portable multiplayer. But at $50 and not packed-in with the system, the asking price considered too steep. The other new title shown off was much more appealing in ARMS. A fighting game that's a cross between Nintendo's own Punch-Out!! and Sega's Virtual-On series, the game used the Joy-Con to mimic a pair of stretchy boxing gloves as players dodge around the arena. While ARMS didn't arrive in time for the Switch's launch, it ultimately ended up being well received, selling over 2 million copies worldwide.

More games were shown off including the sequel to the Wii U's surprise hit, Splatoon, named Splatoon 2, a visual and mechanical improvement over the original in just about every way. Super Mario Odyssey, the latest in the 3D Super Mario series that took the series back to its sandbox roots. Xenoblade Chronicles 2 from Monolith Soft, and Fire Emblem Warriors. Nintendo then moved on to third party titles, including appearances from Sega, Suda 51, Square Enix, and EA, all promising to deliver games to the platform. Nintendo then closed the show by revealing that the highly anticipated Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild will arrive at launch for the new console.

The reception to the reveal was met with mixed reception by gamers. While many hands-on impressions praised the Switch's tech and features, the live presentation, odd software choices, limited third party commitment, and the higher than expected asking price of $300, made everyone skeptical of its success. With the Switch being a clean break for Nintendo, and the company coming off its biggest failure in years, many were unsure about the success of the Switch. But over 85 million units and a library of over 2,000 titles later, The Switch ultimately ended up being a popular and well received platform with a rich selection of games. While it has its hardware flaws *Joy-Con drift*, the Switch still remains one of gaming's most popular platforms with gamers and developers.

Xbox Series S|X

Microsoft Corp. similarly to Nintendo, has had a rough generation. While the Xbox One wasn't quite a failure like the Wii U, the botched pre-launch and lack of killer exclusive titles led to it trailing behind the PlayStation 4 in sales and support by a considerable margin. Microsoft hoped to fix that going into the next generation. Initially going by Project Scarlett, the next Xbox generation was finally shown off at The Game Awards in 2019. The new gen's flagship, is the Xbox Series X, a console that Microsoft claims to be the most powerful machine on the market, featuring Microsoft's Velocity architecture, and an SSD, allowing for quicker load times in games. The very first game revealed, was a sequel to Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice, a move that followed Microsoft's acquisition of Ninja Theory the year prior. As much of the world was locked down during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, Microsoft opted to continue showing off the next generation in live-streamed, pre-recorded presentations broadcasted to YouTube. The first, an episode of Inside Xbox, showcased Microsoft's third party partners for next gen. Among them, was Microsoft's renewed commitment to both exclusives, and foreign developers, notably Japanese developers. New gameplay of Assasin's Creed Valhalla, Scarlet Nexus, Yakuza: Like a Dragon, and others supposedly demonstrating what the Series X is capable of.

A few months later, Microsoft held a proper reveal for Series X featuring mostly first party Xbox Game Studios titles including Halo: Infinite, Everwild, Grounded, a new Fable, and other titles. Months later, the long-rumored second console in the next gen Xbox family was revealed, the Xbox Series S. A cheaper, less powerful, all digital alternative to the Series X, the S was designed with Microsoft's Xbox Game Pass service in mind, allowing users to download games, with the trade off being no physical disc drive. While the Series S and X were well received, Microsoft's gradual reveal was ultimately seen as underwhelming. The INside Xbox episode showed basically nothing impressive, while the Xbox games showcase mostly had no gameplay. For a console touted as the most powerful thing alive, Microsoft sure didn't show it first go-around.

PlayStation 5

As the 8th generation started winding down, the 5th installment in Sony Interactive Entertainment's PlayStation home console franchise was imminent. At first, not much was known about the PlayStation 5, other than the fact that like the Series X, it'll have an SSD instead of a HDD, and would support 4K Blu-Ray. As 2020 drew closer, Sony's Mark Cerny pulled back more details on what new system was about, including the console's new controller, as well as Sony developing a custom 3D sound engine for the platform. Sony later held a special presentation in-lieu of the planned GDC conference in March 2020, in which Cerny finally pulled back the curtain on what exactly is in the new hardware. Turns out that SSD has been heavily customized with a special I/O board that not only allows for even faster load times than a standard SSD, but also allows it to directly interface with the system's GPU and CPU, allowing for new types of gameplay and design, the console's custom audio engine named Tempest, was also detailed at this presentation.

A few months later, the PS5 controller, the DualSense was revealed. Similarly to the Switch, the DualSense is designed around High-definition haptic engine that allows for specific vibrations in different parts of the controller at different volumes. The controller also comes equipped with a mic for gameplay and voice chat, as well as adaptive triggers, that change in resistance depending on in-game context. Finally in June, Sony pulled back the full veil on PS5, and they hit the ground running. Kicking off with some new titles from SIE's "PlayStation Studios" line of first party games. Marvel's Spider-Man: Miles Morales, the semi-sequel to the critically acclaimed PS4 original was the first PS5 title showcased, focusing on Miles Morales filling in for Peter Parker. Sony then moved straight to Gran Turismo 7, the first mainline entry in the racing sim series in nearly a decade. In a similar fashion to Nintendo's reveal of the Switch, Sony flexed the PS5's new tech with a mix of new IP and familiar faces. Ratchet and Clank: Rift Apart marked the duo's first return to an original game since the PS3, and was by far the best showcase of the console's custom SSD, launching Ratchet and Clank from level to level at near instant speeds. Returnal, a new title from Resogun developer Housemarque, is a roguelike shooter that utilizes the SDD to load in as many unique enemies on screen as fast as possible, while also eliminating post-death load times. Destruction All-Stars, a multiplayer brawler with driving mechanics, a remake of PS3 cult-classic Demon's Souls, Sackboy: A Big Adventure, a spin-off of Little Big Planet, Astro's Playroom, a free-pack in showcasing the new DualSense features, and Horizon: Forbidden West, the sequel to 2017's groundbreaking Horizon Zero Dawn. Sony also showed off new games from third parties including a new Square Enix title, Project Athiea, later renamed Forsaken, Hitman 3, Resident Evil 8, and a selection of indie titles including Bugsnax, and Little Inside.

Sony then closed out the show with the full reveal of the console's design. In a tech world filled with indistinguishable black boxes and rectangles, the PS5's big, curvy, and loud two-toned design was a breath of refreshing air when first shown. On top of that, the console was revealed to come in in two varieties. One with a disc drive, and one without. While no price or release date was shown, Sony had a very strong showing for their new console. But even then, it was a bit underwhelming. For a console constantly kept in the dark and hyped up to hell and back, many expected the reveals to be a bit... Bigger than what we got. Still, the sheer variety of games shown WITH proper gameplay, and strong titles on the way, the presentation fueled the hype for the new machine. Near the Holiday season, Sony ran one last hype presentation for the PS5, which detailed the games shown in the last event, as well as a few new ones including Final Fantasy XVI and God of War: Ragnarok, as well as finally revealing the launch price and release date.

Between each of these three pre-launch reveals, which console had the strongest showing?

Nintendo Switch
 

Alan Wake

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Nothing wrong per se with the PS5 reveal. But it came at a time when people were saying "just show us the God damn thing!". The Xbox Series X reveal was so surprising. I really liked the video too, the music and the narrator, and it's cool to hear the live reactions. People were guessing what it is all the way up to where the console was actually revealed.
 
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Yselacrey00

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The PS5 by far. I’m talking about the June event not the GDC conference.

Then you're not playing by the rules.

The best reveal was for the Nintendo Switch no doubt.

Xbox got a fucking 10 second video on the game awards lmao. And PS5 as you said was revealed in a boring conference at GDC.
 
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Omeggos

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Jan 12, 2018
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PlayStation 5 had the better reveal and the switch had the better launch window.

xbox didn’t impress me on either front.

Edit: though credit where it’s due, the Xbox series x reveal was a huge surprise, I’ll give them that. But the general reveal of the PS5 with its launch lineup was insane in comparison.
 
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ZehDon

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Switch was OK, but the console itself underwhelmed me, so I personally didn't really enjoy it all that much.
Series X reveal was a WTF moment that I really enjoyed; didn't see it coming and it left an impact. I think I stared at pictures of it for a while afterwards. "... it's a... fridge?". The events afterwards - the third and first party showcases - where both pretty terrible. The first party showcase in particular is the low-point; opening with Halo Infinite's atrocious reveal and concluding on a badly staged "one more thing" only for it to be a CGI Fable teaser. Awful.
The Road to PS5 was a really, really poor first impression, felt like a return to E3 when they used spreadsheets and graphs. But, the reveal stream itself was... fine. Apart from Ratchet and Clank the games felt underwhelming but nothing bad. But, the console design itself really didn't do much for me; I still think it looks very stupid. The whole affair felt very low effort - but that's a byproduct of COVID, really.
 

Handel

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In terms of just reveal trailers, it's Switch>XSX>PS5. Switch showed off the exciting hybrid nature of the machine, and did well to display the different ways you can use it like multiplayer with just one Switch using individual joycons for controllers. XSX had the air of mystery to it, the great Alan Watt speech, and it showed game related things prior to showing off the box. PS5 is just salivation over a sleek design, which to me looks funky.

In terms of presentations it's Switch>PS5>XSX. Switch presentation was fun to watch, and had a good variety of games, both smaller experimental stuff like Arms and 1, 2, Switch as well as the big boys like Mario and Zelda, ending on the greatest game trailer of all time. PS5 presentation was a solid showing of games with proper gameplay shown. XSX presentation didn't show enough gameplay, and while there were games revealed that I highly anticipate, they're farther out then PS5 titles so not as impactful for the hype around the consoles release.
 

Jaxcellent

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All three were mediocre, not enough games to show, the switch reveal with Zelda was pretty fun tho.. lets see how they reveal the pro model this year...
 

Yselacrey00

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To each their own... The reveal was a surprise and had everybody intrigued and wanting to know more. It did exactly what it set out to do and caught everybody by surprise and for that it is the best most surprising reveal imo.
Yeah, like people didn't want to know about the new xbox before that video.
 

Krappadizzle

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Probably the switch. I didn't know the XsX had been revealed and though it was just a new One X based on it's naming convention. PS5 was ok, but it was no big surprise to me either other than the shape of the system.

Switch, then PS5, then XsX would be my order.

Should have put a poll in OP.
 
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DonJorginho

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The PS5 by far, despite a slow start with the GDC event which misled the mainstream audience (somehow??), the proper event was a huge blowout and took many people's breaths away.

The Series X as good as it looked was revealed in a strange manner, at The Game Awards of all places, it kinda came out of nowhere and not in a good way, many didn't realise it had been revealed.

The Series S would have been a good reveal if it didn't leak ahead of time.

The Switch was a great reveal, but behind the PS5 for me as it was mostly old games that were shown and it didn't have the WOW factor of the PS5 events, not for me anyway.
 
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Hitchyhero

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Console has been a letdown for me (personally) in terms of games.... But the switch reveal was great.

Out of all the 3 it was distinctive, had a great concept and it explained what the console can do well. Nintendo clearly wanted to explain the consoles functions clearly after the Wii U reveal that was confusing as hell. So props to them getting the reveal right.
 
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Rolla

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The numbers from each trailer, released on the platform's official youtube channel, pretty much answer your question.

Nintendo: 46.5 Million (2016)

XBOX Series X: 15.8 Million

Playstation 5: 37.3 Million
 

FritzJ92

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The numbers from each trailer, released on the platform's official youtube channel, pretty much answer your question.

Nintendo: 46.5 Million (2016)

XBOX Series X: 15.8 Million

Playstation 5: 37.3 Million
That doesn’t mean anything regarding the reveal. That’s just fans who wanted to watch it.
 

DonJuanSchlong

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So no one is going to show the trailer for the first consumer PC reveal?

All jokes aside, looking back at the reveals, they all had their strengths. Like others said Xbox came out with a strong trailer and big wtf out of no where. Switch was also a big wtf moment as it was a completely portable system with consistently good lineup. Ps5 took a while to finally get revealed, and some people had mixed reactions, but their second show picked up the slack. Stadia takes the cake though.
 
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lh032

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im pretty sure in terms of reveal wise, PS5 takes the crown, just look at the youtube view count, its crazy
 

anthony2690

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Series x by far, it's honestly not even close, it was a genuine surprise that no one expected. (I'm genuinely surprised it was kept secret)

Anyone saying otherwise is just picking their fave console. :p
 
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Zannegan

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For my money, the Switch, though that's mostly because of all of the drama from insiders claiming contradictory info as "confirmed."

"It's a hybrid." "No way. My source says Nintendo's learned their lesson, and it's a super-powerful console at last. I'll stake my reputation on it! Besides, a hybrid would be DOA. lol."

With all that riding on the reveal, it was guaranteed to be a good time. Plus it's always fun to see Nintendo be wacky while also nailing their messaging. And Karen. The Karen memes were great.

I did also enjoy the pre-reveal PS/MS fan war over which would have more terraflops, but it didn't have quite the same level of drama.
 
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cHaOs667

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Hands down, Series X. Switch is last gen and Sony kept too much information back and some stuff took ages.

Microsoft was on fire, had the hardware unboxing, the hardware assembly with the journalists etc. within a couple of weeks and not months.