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Steam Deck Hardware (an Overview)

tusharngf

Member
Steam just released a video to demonstrate whats inside the architecture.


Video Description: Steam Deck was built from the ground up for an optimal PC handheld gaming experience, and hardware engineer Yazan Aldehayyat shows how - and why- we made it the way we did. Even more importantly, he shows how those decisions allow for developers to bring all different kinds of games to Steam Deck as an optimal experience for players.




 
Do you have a link or do you know how much faster it is?
Not exactly how much faster, but the fact that the 512GB option is the fastest of the three has been repeatedly stated by the Deck specs sheets. It also rings true with the nature of NVMe storage, which gets faster with more memory chips on the board.

IIRC it's maximum VRAM that can be allocated by the system. I wonder why specificy 1GB in that case.
They specify 1GB because it's the minimum allocated (the "guaranteed amount", as they put it). So the system effectively has 15GB of regular RAM and 1GB of VRAM, and the GPU can pull an extra 7GB from the RAM as needed.
 
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They specify 1GB because it's the minimum allocated (the "guaranteed amount", as they put it). So the system effectively has 15GB of regular RAM and 1GB of VRAM, and the GPU can pull an extra 7GB from the RAM as needed.
That makes a lot more sense. The slide was ambiguous, thanks.
 

rnlval

Member
IIRC it's maximum VRAM that can be allocated by the system. I wonder why specificy 1GB in that case.



Nop, 512GB is faster.
On my Ryzen 5 2500U HP Envy 360 before a certain UEFI BIOS update, its reserve VRAM is OEM set to 256 MB and it can cause a game fail. Later BIOS update increased reserve VRAM to 1GB and HP reverse it back down to 256 MB succeeding BIOS updates. :messenger_confused:

Reserve VRAM is different from shared memory. Reserve VRAM is a contiguous memory address range.

I dump my Ryzen 5 2500U HP Envy 360 and purchased Lenovo Thinkpad L14 with Ryzen 7 4750U. Lenovo gave its end users multiple reserve VRAM settings up to 2 GB in the UEFI BIOS.

From my experience, Lenovo's post-sales driver update support is superior when compared to HP. I prefer the reserve VRAM setting to be selectable by the end-user.

I dislike HP, I don't plan to buy any future laptops from HP.
 
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