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Let's Establish What Constitutes "Next Gen" for PS5/Xbox Series Generation

Tqaulity

Member
I've seen much discussion as of late around what constitutes "next gen" and certain games are or are not next gen based upon various often misguided criteria. For example, whether or not the game is a cross gen release or what resolution/frame rate it runs at (how does one figure that 4K/60 equals "next gen"?). That discussion is all subjective and there isn't necessarily a right or wrong answer to what an individual defines is next gen to them. I can respect that. However, I want to go back and make sure that it is clear and documented what the development community and console manufacturers themselves classify as "next gen". This is evident in the features and design of the "next gen" consoles that exist today: PS5, Xbox Series X, and Xbox Series S. Objectively speaking, let's recap the fundamental components of the next generation of gaming:

  1. Modern Highly Threaded CPU: All 3 consoles establish a Zen 2 8C/16T CPU as the baseline. Clock speeds may vary but the capabilities that a modern architecture such as Zen 2 provides along with having access to 16 threads is what developers can count on as a base for building their games.
  2. Ultra-fast SSD: All next-gen consoles feature an SSD with a minimum speed of 2.4 GB/s. This is what developers can expect for their future titles. Note that there may be future HW released that will provide even faster SSD speeds but the point is that an SSD of at least that speed will be needed to support the next gen games already in development
  3. Ray-Tracing Enabled GPU with modern DX12 Ultimate Level Features: All next gen GPUs have a modern feature set that includes ray-tracing acceleration and other DX12 level features such as VRS, Mesh shading etc. Again this isn't about TFLOP count, clock speeds, CU counts etc. It's the feature set and capabilities that matters for developers (as the Xbox Series S demonstrates).

Again I want to stress that the components above are objective definitions of next gen as defined by Microsoft, Sony, and the development community. It is not about performance numbers, resolutions, frame rates, art quality etc (all of which are a product of developer design and capabilities...not HW). It is about the feature set and capabilities the HW provides. For example, by this definition it is clear that the current iteration of Stadia is not next gen capable (no RT support and outdated CPU).

Now what you do on top of this may vary from different manufactures. Sony obviously goes a bit further with the SSD and dedicated I/O, DualSense features, and 3D audio with PS5. Microsoft is pushing features like Quick Resume along with XCloud and enhanced Backwards Compatibility. None of those are "requirements" to build a next gen title but are just "differentiators" to help add value to a particular box. Nintendo may well come out with a Switch Pro or Switch 2.0 or whatever and they could decide to just accelerate existing Switch games (a la PS4 Pro/Xbox One X). But IF they decided to make it "next gen" ready, then it will need to be built around these requirements and have the features above at a minimum for developers to be able to support the new platform with their "next gen" games. It may come from an Intel CPU and Nvidia GPU but it must provide similar CPU feature set and performance to the Zen2 of the current consoles, ray-tracing support, and an SSD.

What I'm reiterating here is that it's the developers that will define what the technology will be for next gen as the makers of the actual SW and the 3 components above are the minimum baseline they are targeting. Sure, everybody can have an opinion on what next gen is for them. The fact of the matter is that designing a game around those 3 components is a fundamental paradigm shift for the developer. The new CPUs can handle much more information and complex instructions for game simulation. The new GPU features like ray-tracing require programmers and artists to develop a ray-tracing pipeline early in development to be most effective. The new SSDs provide 50-100x more I/O bandwidth than was previously possible. It truly opens the door for changing how levels are made, how data is streamed, and removing decades of workarounds built into game engines. To put it simply, nothing we have seen to date is indicative of what next gen gaming will truly look like.

Everything we have seen for "next gen" so far was being developed long before the new consoles were finalized and thus could not truly leverage these key components. Not Demon's Souls, Returnal, or even Ratchet & Clank RA are truly taking advantage of everything next gen has to offer at this point in time. Other games like Horizon and GOW:R was long in development before a PS5 dev kit was ever available. Sure you'll get much better performance than on older systems and the raw power of the CPU, GPU, and SSD will allow for some cool results within the same framework as before. But knowing that a full AAA type of game has an average development cycle of ~3-5 years, it's not until the games coming in 2022/2023 will we start to see fundamental "next gen" games providing experiences that we have not seen before. So yeah, be very excited (and patient) for the future. But if you think that anything we've seen to date is representative of a true next gen game, then you are in for a surprise. Games like Returnal and Rachet & Clank RA are very nice early teasers on what is possible but we still have a long way to go before the dream is realized!
 
Jonah Hill Ok GIF


So basically you're saying it's the start of the generation.
 

skit_data

Member
Will probably take a few years, only then will the engines be rebuilt and we will be able to see some common traits independent of the developer.
 
I enjoyed your post OP and I’m excited but I’d personally say Ratchet is the first truly next gen game we’ve seen. The character models, animation, poly counts, lighting, texture resolution, the amount of enemies on screen, the physics simulations, the alpha effects and the ray tracing (with the option of a 60fps mode no less) and that’s all without mentioning the fact that massive enemies and entire levels (comprised of all the improvements listed above) are being loaded in almost instantly...

Insomniac are simply an incredibly optimised studio so can get games out quicker than everyone else.
 

Tqaulity

Member
I enjoyed your post OP and I’m excited but I’d personally say Ratchet is the first truly next gen game we’ve seen. The character models, animation, poly counts, lighting, texture resolution, the amount of enemies on screen, the physics simulations, the alpha effects and the ray tracing (with the option of a 60fps mode no less) and that’s all without mentioning the fact that massive enemies and entire levels (comprised of all the improvements listed above) are being loaded in almost instantly...

Insomniac are simply an incredibly optimised studio so can get games out quicker than everyone else.
I can respect that. I can’t wait for Ratchet & Clank (I love every game in the series). I think it’s more accurate to say that it is the “most” next gen game we’ve seen thus far (as opposed to the first). Compared to everything before it, it looks beyond comparison. My point is that if Insomniac were to do another R&C game this gen in 2-3years, it will probably be well beyond this game in terms of core design and complexity. But that is not to take anything away from the fact that this game looks absolutely amazing right now.
 

Tqaulity

Member
Next gen stops being next gen when the gen starts; now it's current gen and I'd never pick raytracing over 120hz, ever.
Fair enough. FPS over everything! Personally, 60fps is more than good enough for me and I haven't felt much of a difference with 100-120hz. To my point though, 120hz is NOT a "next gen" core feature. It's fine if its something you look for and enjoy, but there will be plenty of next gen games coming running at less than 120hz.

To your point about next gen stopping when the gen starts, you're obviously referring to the HW availability whereas I'm talking about the SW. Just because the "next gen" hardware is technically on the market doesn't mean we have next gen SW to support it. My point is just that...from a SW standpoint next gen hasn't really started yet. Developers are crunching as we speak on new bespoke engines along with 3rd updates from Epic and Unity to support these new features. Maybe R&C is the first real example but the "next gen" games are still to come.
 

e&e

Banned
Fair enough. FPS over everything! Personally, 60fps is more than good enough for me and I haven't felt much of a difference with 100-120hz. To my point though, 120hz is NOT a "next gen" core feature. It's fine if its something you look for and enjoy, but there will be plenty of next gen games coming running at less than 120hz.

To your point about next gen stopping when the gen starts, you're obviously referring to the HW availability whereas I'm talking about the SW. Just because the "next gen" hardware is technically on the market doesn't mean we have next gen SW to support it. My point is just that...from a SW standpoint next gen hasn't really started yet. Developers are crunching as we speak on new bespoke engines along with 3rd updates from Epic and Unity to support these new features. Maybe R&C is the first real example but the "next gen" games are still to come.
Continually proving the point that Next Gen launched without a Killer App but still selling! Which means killer apps to drive sales are dying!
 
Next Gen is when you can afford it.
Next Gen for me is not going to be next gen for you.
Look at me up here in the clouds while you poor shmucks languish down in the muck. PS, XB? How retro.
I'm getting the new neural implant that plugs me directly into the matrix. I don't need the old implant anymore. Gamestop trade in.
 
Next Gen is when you can afford it.
Next Gen for me is not going to be next gen for you.
Look at me up here in the clouds while you poor shmucks languish down in the muck. PS, XB? How retro.
I'm getting the new neural implant that plugs me directly into the matrix. I don't need the old implant anymore. Gamestop trade in.
 
I've seen much discussion as of late around what constitutes "next gen" and certain games are or are not next gen based upon various often misguided criteria. For example, whether or not the game is a cross gen release or what resolution/frame rate it runs at (how does one figure that 4K/60 equals "next gen"?). That discussion is all subjective and there isn't necessarily a right or wrong answer to what an individual defines is next gen to them. I can respect that. However, I want to go back and make sure that it is clear and documented what the development community and console manufacturers themselves classify as "next gen". This is evident in the features and design of the "next gen" consoles that exist today: PS5, Xbox Series X, and Xbox Series S. Objectively speaking, let's recap the fundamental components of the next generation of gaming:

  1. Modern Highly Threaded CPU: All 3 consoles establish a Zen 2 8C/16T CPU as the baseline. Clock speeds may vary but the capabilities that a modern architecture such as Zen 2 provides along with having access to 16 threads is what developers can count on as a base for building their games.
  2. Ultra-fast SSD: All next-gen consoles feature an SSD with a minimum speed of 2.4 GB/s. This is what developers can expect for their future titles. Note that there may be future HW released that will provide even faster SSD speeds but the point is that an SSD of at least that speed will be needed to support the next gen games already in development
  3. Ray-Tracing Enabled GPU with modern DX12 Ultimate Level Features: All next gen GPUs have a modern feature set that includes ray-tracing acceleration and other DX12 level features such as VRS, Mesh shading etc. Again this isn't about TFLOP count, clock speeds, CU counts etc. It's the feature set and capabilities that matters for developers (as the Xbox Series S demonstrates).

Again I want to stress that the components above are objective definitions of next gen as defined by Microsoft, Sony, and the development community. It is not about performance numbers, resolutions, frame rates, art quality etc (all of which are a product of developer design and capabilities...not HW). It is about the feature set and capabilities the HW provides. For example, by this definition it is clear that the current iteration of Stadia is not next gen capable (no RT support and outdated CPU).

Now what you do on top of this may vary from different manufactures. Sony obviously goes a bit further with the SSD and dedicated I/O, DualSense features, and 3D audio with PS5. Microsoft is pushing features like Quick Resume along with XCloud and enhanced Backwards Compatibility. None of those are "requirements" to build a next gen title but are just "differentiators" to help add value to a particular box. Nintendo may well come out with a Switch Pro or Switch 2.0 or whatever and they could decide to just accelerate existing Switch games (a la PS4 Pro/Xbox One X). But IF they decided to make it "next gen" ready, then it will need to be built around these requirements and have the features above at a minimum for developers to be able to support the new platform with their "next gen" games. It may come from an Intel CPU and Nvidia GPU but it must provide similar CPU feature set and performance to the Zen2 of the current consoles, ray-tracing support, and an SSD.

What I'm reiterating here is that it's the developers that will define what the technology will be for next gen as the makers of the actual SW and the 3 components above are the minimum baseline they are targeting. Sure, everybody can have an opinion on what next gen is for them. The fact of the matter is that designing a game around those 3 components is a fundamental paradigm shift for the developer. The new CPUs can handle much more information and complex instructions for game simulation. The new GPU features like ray-tracing require programmers and artists to develop a ray-tracing pipeline early in development to be most effective. The new SSDs provide 50-100x more I/O bandwidth than was previously possible. It truly opens the door for changing how levels are made, how data is streamed, and removing decades of workarounds built into game engines. To put it simply, nothing we have seen to date is indicative of what next gen gaming will truly look like.

Everything we have seen for "next gen" so far was being developed long before the new consoles were finalized and thus could not truly leverage these key components. Not Demon's Souls, Returnal, or even Ratchet & Clank RA are truly taking advantage of everything next gen has to offer at this point in time. Other games like Horizon and GOW:R was long in development before a PS5 dev kit was ever available. Sure you'll get much better performance than on older systems and the raw power of the CPU, GPU, and SSD will allow for some cool results within the same framework as before. But knowing that a full AAA type of game has an average development cycle of ~3-5 years, it's not until the games coming in 2022/2023 will we start to see fundamental "next gen" games providing experiences that we have not seen before. So yeah, be very excited (and patient) for the future. But if you think that anything we've seen to date is representative of a true next gen game, then you are in for a surprise. Games like Returnal and Rachet & Clank RA are very nice early teasers on what is possible but we still have a long way to go before the dream is realized!
Developers will NOT DEFINE WHAT THE TECHNOLOGY IS FOR NEXT GEN - had that been the case, we would be infinitely stuck with last gen visuals as Developers are tasked with utilizing hardware to the best of their ability while not in fact delivering next gen visuals. Most strides in development are made late in a consoles lifecycle because the dev tools which utilize the hardware are bare minimum. And even then, we are at the behest of a console cycle and developer expertise to fully tap out a machine.

Unfortunately, as with every console generation - there is a visual standard that defines next gen for most.... and Developers seldom if ever are able to fully utilize hardware even at the end of a hardware's lifecycle and truly deliver something "Next Gen" that completely brings the hardware screeching to a halt.

Case in point, One X - will be fully underutilized once retired and as such we may never get a chance to see what type of next gen visuals it would had truly delivered.

But most importantly and this can not be understated.

Add ML Development tools into the mix, that far exceed what the best in class developers can achieve on their own (which brings us back to my first point) and it is obvious we have entered a new paradigm - where the best visuals
a Console may offer - may never in fact be defined by human initiative ever again, particularly once ML dev tools hit consoles in stride.

So I don't for one minute think developers will define next gen, free next gen assets that have been parsed to run efficiently by ML, ML applied smartly to the hardware and free next gen ML/AI toolsets that build the game based on your feedback will be what's moving the industry 1000 miles, per step - ahead and almost singularly once these tools are available. Giving Developers the time needed to brush up on other things like making sure 3d assets meet efficiency standards when leaving the artists pipeline - so that ML can more effectively be applied.

Or making sure levels are built to the highest efficiency standards so that ML can be applied more effectively, ect.

And then eventually, AI will fully supplant all creative endeavors - and one will only purchase a game made by Artists/Devs merely by choice - and the titles humans do make will be far less numerous or in fact expertly made.

Next Gen has not in fact started according to Both Manufacturers of Next Gen Hardware - and we may not truly have an idea of what next gen entails right up until ML/AI takes over the industry.
 
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VFXVeteran

Banned
I've seen much discussion as of late around what constitutes "next gen" and certain games are or are not next gen based upon various often misguided criteria. For example, whether or not the game is a cross gen release or what resolution/frame rate it runs at (how does one figure that 4K/60 equals "next gen"?). That discussion is all subjective and there isn't necessarily a right or wrong answer to what an individual defines is next gen to them. I can respect that. However, I want to go back and make sure that it is clear and documented what the development community and console manufacturers themselves classify as "next gen". This is evident in the features and design of the "next gen" consoles that exist today: PS5, Xbox Series X, and Xbox Series S. Objectively speaking, let's recap the fundamental components of the next generation of gaming:

  1. Modern Highly Threaded CPU: All 3 consoles establish a Zen 2 8C/16T CPU as the baseline. Clock speeds may vary but the capabilities that a modern architecture such as Zen 2 provides along with having access to 16 threads is what developers can count on as a base for building their games.
  2. Ultra-fast SSD: All next-gen consoles feature an SSD with a minimum speed of 2.4 GB/s. This is what developers can expect for their future titles. Note that there may be future HW released that will provide even faster SSD speeds but the point is that an SSD of at least that speed will be needed to support the next gen games already in development
  3. Ray-Tracing Enabled GPU with modern DX12 Ultimate Level Features: All next gen GPUs have a modern feature set that includes ray-tracing acceleration and other DX12 level features such as VRS, Mesh shading etc. Again this isn't about TFLOP count, clock speeds, CU counts etc. It's the feature set and capabilities that matters for developers (as the Xbox Series S demonstrates).

Again I want to stress that the components above are objective definitions of next gen as defined by Microsoft, Sony, and the development community. It is not about performance numbers, resolutions, frame rates, art quality etc (all of which are a product of developer design and capabilities...not HW). It is about the feature set and capabilities the HW provides. For example, by this definition it is clear that the current iteration of Stadia is not next gen capable (no RT support and outdated CPU).

Now what you do on top of this may vary from different manufactures. Sony obviously goes a bit further with the SSD and dedicated I/O, DualSense features, and 3D audio with PS5. Microsoft is pushing features like Quick Resume along with XCloud and enhanced Backwards Compatibility. None of those are "requirements" to build a next gen title but are just "differentiators" to help add value to a particular box. Nintendo may well come out with a Switch Pro or Switch 2.0 or whatever and they could decide to just accelerate existing Switch games (a la PS4 Pro/Xbox One X). But IF they decided to make it "next gen" ready, then it will need to be built around these requirements and have the features above at a minimum for developers to be able to support the new platform with their "next gen" games. It may come from an Intel CPU and Nvidia GPU but it must provide similar CPU feature set and performance to the Zen2 of the current consoles, ray-tracing support, and an SSD.

What I'm reiterating here is that it's the developers that will define what the technology will be for next gen as the makers of the actual SW and the 3 components above are the minimum baseline they are targeting. Sure, everybody can have an opinion on what next gen is for them. The fact of the matter is that designing a game around those 3 components is a fundamental paradigm shift for the developer. The new CPUs can handle much more information and complex instructions for game simulation. The new GPU features like ray-tracing require programmers and artists to develop a ray-tracing pipeline early in development to be most effective. The new SSDs provide 50-100x more I/O bandwidth than was previously possible. It truly opens the door for changing how levels are made, how data is streamed, and removing decades of workarounds built into game engines. To put it simply, nothing we have seen to date is indicative of what next gen gaming will truly look like.

Everything we have seen for "next gen" so far was being developed long before the new consoles were finalized and thus could not truly leverage these key components. Not Demon's Souls, Returnal, or even Ratchet & Clank RA are truly taking advantage of everything next gen has to offer at this point in time. Other games like Horizon and GOW:R was long in development before a PS5 dev kit was ever available. Sure you'll get much better performance than on older systems and the raw power of the CPU, GPU, and SSD will allow for some cool results within the same framework as before. But knowing that a full AAA type of game has an average development cycle of ~3-5 years, it's not until the games coming in 2022/2023 will we start to see fundamental "next gen" games providing experiences that we have not seen before. So yeah, be very excited (and patient) for the future. But if you think that anything we've seen to date is representative of a true next gen game, then you are in for a surprise. Games like Returnal and Rachet & Clank RA are very nice early teasers on what is possible but we still have a long way to go before the dream is realized!
Very good post.

It's also worth reiterating that we aren't talking about PC hardware here. The featureset for the PC GPUs have had these implemented (save the I/O) for years now. The graphics engines will evolve for sure but some these featuresets are already in place with some graphics engines even though they haven't been implemented to full capacity (i.e. UE4, REremake, 4A, Remedy, etc.. has RT code already).

People will of course, state their own subjective opinion on what next-gen is and that's A-OK. But realize what is objective and what is subjective. It's very important in these discussions.
 

VFXVeteran

Banned
Will probably take a few years, only then will the engines be rebuilt and we will be able to see some common traits independent of the developer.
Engines aren't rebuilt from scratch. We have UE4 as a testitment to that. There is already RT pipeline in it and UE5 isn't even out yet.
 

Tqaulity

Member
Developers will NOT DEFINE WHAT THE TECHNOLOGY IS FOR NEXT GEN
I meant this more indirectly but ultimately if you look at the core features of next gen for the past 2 generations in particular, those were decided with direct feedback from developers. For example, with the PS4 the top 2 things developers requested was less exotic CPU and more RAM. Thus the move to x86 (even at the expense of performance) and pushing for the 8GB of RAM. For PS5 the biggest requests were for faster I/0 and more CPU power. Hence the standard SSDs and Zen2 CPUs. Historically yes the Japanese systems from Sony, Sega, and Nintendo were developed more in a silo with whatever the hardware designers wanted to do. But as of late, developers have been way more enpowered in influencing the core baseline system designs.
 

Lethal01

Member
Design your game around 1440p 30fps first.
Only then should you slap on a mode where the resolution goes down until the game reaches 60fps.
 

peter42O

Member
For me, it's been the constant and consistent 60FPS for games and the fast loading times due to the SSD on Series X and to think, they're not even using the vast majority of what the console can do and I can't wait for 2022 when cross-gen ends for Microsoft and slowly ends for third parties. Compared to PS4/XBO, there's no way I could ever go back.
 
I meant this more indirectly but ultimately if you look at the core features of next gen for the past 2 generations in particular, those were decided with direct feedback from developers. For example, with the PS4 the top 2 things developers requested was less exotic CPU and more RAM. Thus the move to x86 (even at the expense of performance) and pushing for the 8GB of RAM. For PS5 the biggest requests were for faster I/0 and more CPU power. Hence the standard SSDs and Zen2 CPUs. Historically yes the Japanese systems from Sony, Sega, and Nintendo were developed more in a silo with whatever the hardware designers wanted to do. But as of late, developers have been way more enpowered in influencing the core baseline system designs.
Yes but that goalpost is an ever moving target and as standard developers have done a terrible job of bring next gen gaming to the forefront. There is a reason we got games like Skyrim and BF3 late in the 360's life cycle, and games of this caliber would had continue to release - redefining next gen gaming until the system hardware was fully tapped out. To date developers only in fact define a common next gen standard - that has always served to the lowest common denominator - that being - fully modular assets that quickly max out the throughput of hardware - will little thought given on how to improve that metric for current gen in leu of next gen hardware. That standard is not representative of developers who able to fully utilize the hardware. Which means that standard gamers rely on, is in fact why visuals have suffered - developers are bad at creating a standard that fully maximizes visual fidelity which is why
most indie gaming efforts are utilizing sprite techniques that have long since diminished in leu of more sophisticated visual toolsets.

This will become extremely apparent as time moves forward and ML takes the reign so smaller devs begin making titles that compete with large corporate offerings visually.

When this happens, how have Devs created in fact any standard at all?

It will make it extremely obvious that Devs were and have always been reliant on sophisticated toolsets that have been primarily out of their hands until the end of a console generation.

Even those who are able to build their own Tool Sets - are heavily reliant on MS/AMD/Nvidia and their own toolsets in order to exploit console hardware and this creates no official standard for next gen visuals.

Fully replete toolsets that take full advantage of current Hardware, though at limited values - actually existed at the beginning of last gen, thankfully.

The utter lack of innovation in traditional next gen development will again become apparent once ML fully supplants the industry.

Until now, most development strides have been through baseline modification/optimization of an engine - increasing values so that the artist has more room to work. Which means most of the programming standards were built into the games you've enjoyed for close to 2 decades... it takes nothing to increase integer values and tune towards performance considering most engines used over the last decade - were built to be expanded on, with very little dev involvement. Game Engine Sliders that once increased - allow for far more visual fidelity, and only very modest dev optimization.

Aside from Unreal Engine 4, and Unity and a handful of other engines - most engines are not being built with the developer actually in mind. And even then, these engines too are preparing to completely shift towards an entirely different, automated platform.

This will become particularly apparent once developers admit to how much AI/ML has been utilized this gen to improve the visuals in their own game. I fully expect a game to come out within this console generation, that is built almost completely utilizing AI and ML with keyboard descriptions building most of the gameplay and visual aspects.... and with very little actual artist or developer input.
 

Fredrik

Gold Member
Seeing console games running at 120fps was a big moment for me. But for me it’s all about VR right now, I jumped in on a Quest 2 and wireless VR to PC is more next gen than all raytracing and fast load times will ever be.
 

Represent.

Member
well that's the most disgusting think I heard today

30fps? HELL THE FUCK NO.
God you FPS nerds are so fucking ... boring.

IS FPS ALL YOU CARE ABOUT? Holy christ.

Did you not see the part where I said I want CINEMA QUALITY visual fidelity? If it has to be at 30FPS then good riddance.

60 fps is the most overrated shit in gaming history.

And im not yelling at you personally lmao just FPS nerds in general :messenger_smirking:
 

Roni

Member
120fps may "feel" next gen, but the games look ugly as FUCK.

Im already done with that trend.

I want cinema quality graphics. 30FPS, all out fidelity.

We're not anywhere close to what I expect.

I think the SECOND games from the big studios this gen, we'll get there.
You're on to something, but my personal sweet spot is 60@1080p...
 

Banjo64

cumsessed
120fps may "feel" next gen, but the games look ugly as FUCK.

Im already done with that trend.

I want cinema quality graphics. 30FPS, all out fidelity.

We're not anywhere close to what I expect.

I think the SECOND games from the big studios this gen, we'll get there.
Depends on the game. Rocket League at 120fps is 720p and looks like the Switch version (absolute shite).

Gears 5, Ori Will of the Wisps and Halo MCC all look fantastic at 120fps.

Personally I’d be delighted if 60fps finally became the norm this gen with 120fps being reserved for 2D side scrollers/smaller games.

I also love what Xbox are doing with 120fps support for Xbox One games and I’d love the Dark Souls trilogy, Hollow Knight, Ori and the Blind Forest, Cuphead and a few more timeless classics to get this treatment. I’d rather have these quick wins and upgrades for older games than wait for 10 years for a new lick of paint and a £70 price tag.
 
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Banjo64

cumsessed
God you FPS nerds are so fucking ... boring.

IS FPS ALL YOU CARE ABOUT? Holy christ.

Did you not see the part where I said I want CINEMA QUALITY visual fidelity? If it has to be at 30FPS then good riddance.

60 fps is the most overrated shit in gaming history.

And im not yelling at you personally lmao just FPS nerds in general :messenger_smirking:
Why stop at 30fps in the quest for CINEMATIC VISUALS? Why not drop it to 24fps like actual movies? In fact if we go even lower, like say 12fps, then we can crank the visuals even higher.
 
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