What is the correct way to start learning Python?

Greetings, GAF, maybe this is a silly question, but for almost a year now I am trying to start learning Python, but I always come to some sort of wall, because the courses that are out there on the surface web are extremely limited, it feels like I am not learning enough, the "courses" that I usually find lose my interest rather quickly. I think that am doing something wrong and I need to start from the complete bottom and eventually try to work my way to the top, which is considered a moderate amount of knowledge that can help me to create my own projects. Here is the picture: I am someone who knows barely anything about programming and I am not very good at advance math, does this mean that it is pointless for me to even start learning Python? And if not, what is the definitive way for someone like me to start learning Python?
Why Python? - I have heard that it's the easiest language to start learning, and I feel like I can find a lot of value for myself should I obtain proper Python skills, I can develop software for people, I can make my own life easier by working on personal projects.
 

M1chl

Currently Gif and Meme Champion
What Python do you wish to learn? For ML or for general purpose programming? If you wish to program for web in it, you need to look for DJANGO tutorials. Or Flask.
 

M1chl

Currently Gif and Meme Champion
I don't think course is the right thing tho, I think it simply better to set a goal what you want to do (start with simple calculator for example) and stackoverflow your way through and keep going like that till you will have the general knowledge. Watching something gives you nothing.
 
I don't think course is the right thing tho, I think it simply better to set a goal what you want to do (start with simple calculator for example) and stackoverflow your way through and keep going like that till you will have the general knowledge. Watching something gives you nothing.
My goal is to have a know-how for any possible situation, let's say that I wanted to develop a calculator, just like you said, or my own local password manager, or an app, it's more of a general skill that I want to have so that I can possibly make a living out of in the future, but also to entertain my own curiosity in terms of how far I can push my knowledge and what I can do with it.
 
I don't think course is the right thing tho, I think it simply better to set a goal what you want to do (start with simple calculator for example) and stackoverflow your way through and keep going like that till you will have the general knowledge. Watching something gives you nothing.
This is the way. Courses can work but what M1chl said is how most people I know learned how to code.
 

Haemi

Member
Like M1chl said, set a goal and start programming. Programming is like puzzle solving. You get better with practice.
Learn the basics like for, while, if, classes etc. Everything else is remembering libraries and functions.
And always remember: An engineer doesn‘t know everything. He knows where he can find the things he needs to know. So use sites like google and stackoverflow.
 

M1chl

Currently Gif and Meme Champion
My goal is to have a know-how for any possible situation, let's say that I wanted to develop a calculator, just like you said, or my own local password manager, or an app, it's more of a general skill that I want to have so that I can possibly make a living out of in the future, but also to entertain my own curiosity in terms of how far I can push my knowledge and what I can do with it.
I honestly don't think that Python is right for that, HOWEVER, if you learn to do something in it, you can then easily go to different language which is better suited for the task. But there is a shitton of python libraries and you can do practically anything....slowly....

I would say go for RUST, which is THE global purpose language, however that would be really steep start.
 

bender

What time is it?
 

Ionian

Member
Did Python my final year in college for testing DNA for abnormalities in medical records.

Hated it but only as it was the last semester. Seemed pretty simple syntax. It been simpler made it harder for me which is hilarious. Professor wasn't great but's very similar to earlier languages so not that hard if you've already dived in.
 

pramod

Member
What aspect of Python are u having problems with? I pretty much learned it in an afternoon reading a Python for Dummies book.

The only really annoying part for me was getting used to the tabbing/formatting rules Python expects you to follow.
 
Last edited:

dr_octagon

Banned
This was the pilot episode for Senfold episode, OP is Kraymor.

Kraymer: It's C++ Jerry.
Jerry: What's wrong with normal C?
Bald guy: It's not the same.
Newman: Hello Jerry.
Jerry: Hello Newman.
Eileen: What about Java?
Jerry: I'd love a cup.
 
Last edited:
I'm looking at diversifying my stack a little bit, want to learn some devops related stuff to compliment my knowledge of web front-end stuff.

Should I look into Python? I've barely done devops stuff at my work so far, and that was basically messing with deployments which were written bash, so I don't know if taking a few Python courses will be worth it.
 
Top Bottom