• Hey, guest user. Hope you're enjoying NeoGAF! Have you considered registering for an account? Come join us and add your take to the daily discourse.

White Cop Who Finds He Has African Ancestry Sues City, Chief Over Racism

Based on the title I thought the story would be about someone taking the piss and clambering for reparations when they found out they were 1/64th black.

This... is considerably worse. Even identifying as white didn't protect him from the one drop rule.
 

Mael

Member
In France, we would make a comedy movie about that...
And the movie would be full of racist jokes.
I wonder how low you have to get to not be considered black for these people...
 

itwasTuesday

He wasn't alone.
Why didn't he just call him Geordi La Forge?

I know what they did is gross. But in my head i'm imagining Cleon doing this the next day.


I'm sorry.
 
This is awful.

Side question for any biologists/anthropologists/others in the thread: Given that we all are descendant from Africa, how much of that is reflected on average for white people in genetic testing? Is there a general percentage of common ancestry that is the same and then there are additional genetic traits that can be traced to specific regions of the world? Not sure how all this works.
 
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?
 

NandoGip

Member
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

Blackface is always wrong

He cant say nigga, not cuz of his blood but because hes still a white man. His whole life he was white, this new information doesnt change that

Regarding mixed race, 50/50 black/white are usually considered black in my experience unless you literally look 100% white
 
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?
No. To anyone that doesn't know this story, and for much of this man's life, he was white. Hell, he still /is/ white. The one drop rule one applies for racists. Just cuz he has some residual black in him (like I'd assume A LOT of folk do) doesn't mean he can start "being black".
I know you're asking a genuine question here (I hope). But think about it dude.
 

NeonBlack

Member
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

Blackface is never appropriate, not even for black people.
 

Cocaloch

Member
What an obscure reference.

You think Roots is obscure?

Side question for any biologists/anthropologists/others in the thread: Given that we all are descendant from Africa, how much of that is reflected on average for white people in genetic testing? Is there a general percentage of common ancestry that is the same and then there are additional genetic traits that can be traced to specific regions of the world? Not sure how all this works.

These gentic tests don't really correlate as well as the companies selling them pretend they do to populations in particular areas.

This makes sense because race and ethnicity are not genetic, they are social and historical.
 
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

This..is an amazing question in here.
 

wenis

Registered for GAF on September 11, 2001.
Sounds like cop culture. i've definitely heard similar enough shit from my dad talking about his 30 years on the force as a mexican man. brutish, cruel and cult like.
 

Paltheos

Member
The real shocking part is his appearance. I mean... I really don't want to believe stories like this, but I pulled up the article hoping to see a picture of him. Lo and behold, there he is annnnd... he's as white-looking as they come. And the department still gives him shit?
 
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

That is quite the strange line of questioning. Why would black people accept him in black face hollering nigga?
 
The real shocking part is his appearance. I mean... I really don't want to believe stories like this, but I pulled up the article hoping to see a picture of him. Lo and behold, there he is annnnd... he's as white-looking as they come. And the department still gives him shit?
Not shocking the me. He's most likely getting the amount of flak he is /because/ how white he looks.
It's the juxtaposition that makes it humorous to racists.
 

BitStyle

Unconfirmed Member
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

Why the fuck would a black dude, mixed or not, want to show up in blackface?
Very suspect line of questioning
 
This is awful.

Side question for any biologists/anthropologists/others in the thread: Given that we all are descendant from Africa, how much of that is reflected on average for white people in genetic testing? Is there a general percentage of common ancestry that is the same and then there are additional genetic traits that can be traced to specific regions of the world? Not sure how all this works.

The wiki gives a pretty decent rundown: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogical_DNA_test

Most DNA tests aren't looking for actual allelic variations in genes, but for highly conserved single nucleotide polymorphisms.

Relevant to your question,
Autosomal DNA recombines each generation.[5] Therefore, the number of markers[clarification needed] shared with a specific ancestor decreases by about half each generation.

Generally, you will have more SNPs in common with people you share significant common ancestry with. By creating a statistical cladogram, you can determine where points of divergence took place.

I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

Mixed-race Americans can be the subject of bullying from both blacks and whites, but traditionally, unless you can "pass" as all white, you are treated as black. As this officer has been treated and identified as a white person all of his life, it would be culturally insensitive and reductive for him to claim an experience, customs, or language that to this point had been completely foreign to him.

Being black is not a costume, even for other black people. And if you walk around calling people you don't know the N word (even the 'friendly' version), you're going to draw negative attention to yourself, even if you're black.
 

mantidor

Member
This is awful.

Side question for any biologists/anthropologists/others in the thread: Given that we all are descendant from Africa, how much of that is reflected on average for white people in genetic testing? Is there a general percentage of common ancestry that is the same and then there are additional genetic traits that can be traced to specific regions of the world? Not sure how all this works.

Not an expert, but I'm pretty sure the first humans in Africa were nothing like modern day Africans.

I remember one study that found difference in DNA bigger between some African countries than the difference between an African and an European.
 
I know this may seem like a strange question to ask...but if this guy showed up in blackface would it be alright? can he say the n word?

I really am curious how mixed race are treated on both ends. we can see how white people react... do black people not accept him either?

He can say 18% of the n-word and paint only his forehead.
 

Zoe

Member
This is awful.

Side question for any biologists/anthropologists/others in the thread: Given that we all are descendant from Africa, how much of that is reflected on average for white people in genetic testing? Is there a general percentage of common ancestry that is the same and then there are additional genetic traits that can be traced to specific regions of the world? Not sure how all this works.

When people do those tests, they're looking for a few hundred years of history, not 10's of thousands.
 
He still has the daily advantage of not looking black.

It's an odd zone to be in, to be a PoC through the blood in your veins but not in your appearance.

Being a pasty white Hispanic, I can relate to some extent, but being part of a demonized minority and yet never having been the direct subject of racial hatred is very surreal.
 

SpaceWolf

Banned
Oh, yeah, this thread. Maybe I'll check back in to see what people are saying about the sto-

Not really

Thought that too.

Really?

Really lol..

No it isn't.

That was a very popular movie.

Uh, Roots was a big deal back in the 70s, when the miniseries aired.

This has to be sarcasm. Please tell me this is sarcasm.


I haven't even seen Roots and I get the reference. :v

What???? Maybe you are real young?

... It's not



Reading through the replies, I was halfway tempted to try and play off my original post as a joke as some people assumed, but I'll try and do the honourable thing and accept the pummelling for my apparent benightedness.

Up until I checked out this story, I have to confess that I had honestly never heard of Roots, nor about its subsequent adaptations! For what it's worth, I'm in my twenties and live in England and was never exposed to neither the book nor the 1970's mini-series, not even as a literature student, but clearly, that's not much of an excuse given its apparent cultural impact around the world. I simply assumed the officer in question was making some kind of strangely obscure literary reference in reference to some random novel I'd never heard about. I'm especially ashamed given that I'm now reading up on it and that it's apparently one of the most seminal literary works in US history. Please forgive me!

Does the 1970s series still hold up? I might check it out if I can find it somewhere.
 
Top Bottom