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New 3DMark Test pit's AMD against NVIDIA in Raytracing Performance Tests

Nhranaghacon

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The launch of AMD Radeon RX 6000 Series graphics cards on November 18 will end NVIDIA’s monopoly on real-time ray tracing. For the first time, gamers will have a choice of GPU vendors when buying a ray-tracing-capable graphics card.

Today, we’re releasing a new 3DMark feature test that measures pure ray-tracing performance. You can use the 3DMark DirectX Raytracing feature test to compare the performance of the dedicated ray-tracing hardware in the latest graphics cards from AMD and NVIDIA.


3DMark DirectX Raytracing feature test
Real-time ray tracing is incredibly demanding. The latest graphics cards have dedicated hardware that’s optimized for ray-tracing operations. Despite the advances in GPU performance, the demands are still too high for a game to rely on ray tracing alone. That’s why games use ray tracing to complement traditional rendering techniques.

The 3DMark DirectX Raytracing feature test is designed to make ray-tracing performance the limiting factor. Instead of relying on traditional rendering, the whole scene is ray-traced and drawn in one pass.

The result of the test depends entirely on ray-tracing performance, which means you can measure and compare the performance of dedicated ray-tracing hardware in the latest graphics cards.



 
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Nhranaghacon

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A new pretty raytracing test and no views :messenger_tongue:
edit: theeeere are the views, mods can delete this specific post if need be.
 
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Nhranaghacon

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Judging by the noisy backgrounds and when the camera is moved, that seems to be real-time path tracing... quite impressive to get 30fps with that

I noticed this too except that an actual solution would be for immediate denoising - so I'm not terribly impressed, and it seems like it may be dispersed to individual render layers - but path-tracing is the way to go and will offer the largest graphical leap ever seen in terms of visuals in the future (most on GAF have no idea) - I imagine the noise will immediately disappear in future hardware iterations once thing's become quick enough. But I still don't think Path-Tracing is being applied to all assets/the entire scene.
 

Black_Stride

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eeeemmm excuse me ?!
Why would someone make official benchmarks and give it to You for free ? I've paid like 10 bucks for whole 3dmark suite

So that you have a larger test pool?



Pretty sure every renderer whether testing the CPU or GPU or both has a free benchmark tier.

Even some games let you download the benchmark without actually owning the game.

The way it should be.
 

tkscz

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Does it make use of the Tensor cores on the nVidia GPUs or is it solely pushing the RT cores?
 

Hudo

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I noticed this too except that an actual solution would be for immediate denoising - so I'm not terribly impressed, and it seems like it may be dispersed to individual render layers - but path-tracing is the way to go and will offer the largest graphical leap ever seen in terms of visuals in the future (most on GAF have no idea) - I imagine the noise will immediately disappear in future hardware iterations once thing's become quick enough. But I still don't think Path-Tracing is being applied to all assets/the entire scene.
Yeah. I think I remember a paper from not too long ago trying to "interpolate" noisy frames rendered with path tracing via a trained CNN. However, this approach is obviously far from ready for gaming in general, unless GPU manufacturers get gamers to agree on sending frame data or something back to the manufacturers so they have data for training.
 

Esppiral

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God lord, terrible dithering and grainy picture, of that we have to expect from ray tracing better keep it on the oven for a couple more years.....
 

rofif

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So that you have a larger test pool?



Pretty sure every renderer whether testing the CPU or GPU or both has a free benchmark tier.

Even some games let you download the benchmark without actually owning the game.

The way it should be.
Then use other stuff and don't complain.
3dmark is very good, there is an easy way to compare detailed results and so on.
If You want all of that for free then good luck...

What is wrong with people wanting shit for free. WTF
UL benchmarks (previously, madonion, futuremark etc... part of remedy founders) hires almost 50 people. They need to model benchmarks with state of the art graphics and keep the scores fair not to skew in any vendor direction. They can't be owned by amd or nvidia.
So Your stupid ass wanting "free benchmarks" is just like wanting free games. There is a free version of 3dmark on steam
 

Pagusas

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God lord, terrible dithering and grainy picture, of that we have to expect from ray tracing better keep it on the oven for a couple more years.....

Its not, we've already seen games give us good quality versions of RT. Whatever they are doing here, isnt what the real world gaming has been like. Just look at WDL
 

mckmas8808

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Then use other stuff and don't complain.
3dmark is very good, there is an easy way to compare detailed results and so on.
If You want all of that for free then good luck...

What is wrong with people wanting shit for free. WTF
UL benchmarks (previously, madonion, futuremark etc... part of remedy founders) hires almost 50 people. They need to model benchmarks with state of the art graphics and keep the scores fair not to skew in any vendor direction. They can't be owned by amd or nvidia.
So Your stupid ass wanting "free benchmarks" is just like wanting free games. There is a free version of 3dmark on steam

This is the "Entitled Generation" where if you don't get it for free, it better cost less than a McDonald's happy meal, or else it'll be view as corporations cheating you out of your money.
 
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Ascend

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Meh. As long as games are going to use primarily hybrid rendering, this benchmark is good for indication of direct capability, but far from a good measurement for gaming performance.
 

RoadHazard

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That looked terrible. We're clearly nowhere near ready for this extensive raytracing yet. Give me traditional rendering with a few RT touches here and there any day of the week.

But yes, I understand that's not the point of this.
 

Insane Metal

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LOL THAT DOESN'T LOOK GOOD

OMG calm your fucking tits. Pure Ray Tracing, with huge numbers of rays is costly as fuck and basically no game has done it yet. This benchmark probably does it at a very high number of intersections in whole scene area or something like softwares which takes MINUTES to render a picture. This is a benchmark.
 

T8SC

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Almost looks as good as the helicopter benchmark scene in 3D Mark 2000.
 

Nhranaghacon

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typically, no actually - always - in respect to 3dmark test's - once standard hardware has broken the 100FPS barrier on the most current non overclocked PC's - it mean's expect to start seeing that feature never dip below 50-60fps again when deployed in gaming. Which is an exemplary indicator of performance. The noise is due to Path Tracing Implementation - a technique far beyond what Ray Tracing deliver's as it is the main rendering technique for CGI film and still in many cases takes minutes to hour's to render 1 frame. However those frames are rendered at 1028bit's (and over) across the entire spectrum of rendering features... with far far more than the 15 to 20 render samples shown - a CGI render utilizes about 2000 passes on low average to render 1 frame - unlike game engines that use single pass rasterization methods to speed up performance while trying to deliver all of the features seen during a render at bit rates far below 1028bits, and far far below 2000 render passes on the low end....

We are probably no more than 10 years away from having GPU's with some type of real time per pixel Path-Tracing ability - the actual holy grail of real-time graphics.
 
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Anyone who thinks this isn’t insanely impressive is just not understanding what is going on properly. To think that hardware has come far enough for ray tracing to be this close to implementation. I remember reading about its use in 3d animated films many years ago and I would have never have believed we’d be seeing such wide use of the tech so soon. It’s so calculation heavy to do EVERYTHING with rays. It’s a mind blowing time to be alive and the tech jumps we’re seeing in the past couple of years is just wonderful to behold as a tech enthusiast.

Sure, it’s not perfectly rendered but that’s running on a 3070. I want to see this on a 3090, and I’m sure it’s still not going to be perfect but using path tracing depth of field and still getting 30fps with some lag in the de-noiser blows my mind.

typically, no actually - always - in respect to 3dmark test's - once standard hardware has broken the 100FPS barrier on the most current non overclocked PC's - it mean's expect to start seeing that feature never dip below 50-60fps again when deployed in gaming. Which is an exemplary indicator of performance. The noise is due to Path Tracing Implementation - a technique far beyond what Ray Tracing deliver's as it is the main rendering technique for CGI film and still in many cases takes minutes to hour's to render 1 frame. However those frames are rendered at 1028bit's (and over) across the entire spectrum of rendering features... unlike game engines that use rasterization methods to speed up performance while trying to deliver all of the features seen during a render at bit rates far below 1028bits.

We are probably no more than 10 years away from having GPU's with some type of real time per pixel Path-Tracing ability - the actual holy grail of real-time graphics.

I believe you’re right. pixel sized voxels + path tracing and we might as well be simulating real life. Things seems to be really accelerating lately and I wonder if it will even take 10 years.

those smaller fab processes really make incredible differences. So many more processors per wafer is totally awesome bring on 5nm.

but what are they going to do when they hit the atomic limit? It’s going to have to be core and massive parallelism right? I’m hoping we’ll start to see 64 and 128 cores being the common number within the next 5 years.
 
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longdi

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That looked terrible. We're clearly nowhere near ready for this extensive raytracing yet. Give me traditional rendering with a few RT touches here and there any day of the week.

But yes, I understand that's not the point of this.

no surprises, 3dmark always have the shittest looking demos. Their artists are dirt cheap and outsourced.

I wish nvidia marbles demo is released with a benchmark mode.
 

Raploz

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The fact we're getting real-time full path tracing on consumer level hardware is mind blowing. People have no idea of how expensive path tracing is. They must be using more than 1 sample per pixel or some noise reduction algorithm because even achieving "only" that amount of noise is still impressive. This is pretty much a taste of the future, I guess we'll see a huge boom of fully path-tracing games on the next generation (PS6, Xbox ?).
 
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rofif

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The fact we're getting real-time full path tracing on consumer level hardware is mind blowing. People have no idea of how expensive path tracing is. They must be using more than 1 sample per pixel or some noise reduction algorithm because even achieving "only" that amount of noise is still impressive. This is pretty much a taste of the future, I guess we'll see a huge boom of fully path-tracing games on the next generation (PS6, Xbox ?).
Yeah I think it's impressive af. There is no denoiser in there because it is raw ray tracing power benchmark... And people just say it looks bad. It does not matter how it looks
 

Barakov

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Seems like we're pretty close to that raytracing holy land everyone has been looking for. Though seems like we're not quite there yet. Maybe in a couple years.
 
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llien

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That looked terrible. We're clearly nowhere near ready for this extensive raytracing yet.

It is worth noting that actual ray traced image looks far FAR FAR worse than what is shown, as we can see in Quake RT (open source, so people can play with it)
There are 2 different things which are going on even in game with trivial geometry like Quake:

1) smart ass decisions on where to cast rays and where not
2) step that turns noisy mess into something quite palatable


Yeah I think it's impressive af. There is no denoiser in there because it is raw ray tracing power benchmark...
BS.

<< images incoming >>

How Quake RT frame really looks like after RT pass is done:



Evidence of "using tricks" even to achieve render above:



A - rendered at 1/4 resolution
B - tranparency, this is a reflection on water, old-school 1995 DirectX 3.0 dither hack rather than real transparency calculations
C - the actual resolution of traced rays - each bright dot in region C is a ray that has been traced in just 4-bit chroma and all the dark space is essentially guesswork/temporal patterns tiled and rotated based on the frequency of those ray hits. If you go and look at a poorly-lit corner of the room you can clearly see the repeated tiling of these 'best guess' dot patterns and they have nothing to do with the noisier, more random bright specs that are the individual ray samples.

more to it:


If you were wondering why evil/lazy/<insert word> developers are not using this wonderful technology, this is why: it is not even remotely as far as claimed.
 
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