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My weekly meeting with my boss was rescheduled to be in person tomorrow. How fucked am I?

teezzy

Fantastik Tuna
Umbasaborne Umbasaborne

Just make a plan of how you intend to improve and go in prepared

Meanwhile. Worst case scenario. Tighten up your resume and start seeing what other opportunities there are

My performance at work is also suffering. I'm not happy there, despite the money being good, and I'm following a similar path. In the meanwhile I'm just gonna keep trucking. Life's too short. It's just a job. Be frugal and one step ahead of them
 
Hey guys, each week i have a virtual one to one with my boss. But this weeks meeting has been rescheduled to be in person. Its a newish job, and I've been having some performance issues lately due to me taking longer to learn the position than expected. Am freaking out that im walking into the office tomorrow to get fired, and I wish they would just terminate me over a virtual meeting if they are going to do it. This is my first career job out of college, and im scared that if im sacked, then i will be viewed as unhirable in this field.

Our one to one meeting is an hour after our team meeting. Wouldnt it make more sense to fire me before the team meeting?
Probably feel they can fix you. Listen, take notes, and improve.
 

Rival

Gold Member
I doubt very much they would let you go after a team meeting. Use it as an opportunity to take feedback and improve and to let your boss know that you can and will do the job well. Let us know how it goes.
 

dr_octagon

Gold Member
Not fired…yet. Fingers crossed
The Office Monday GIF by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment
 

DadEggs

Member
prob just a check in tbh. a place isnt going to fire a new hire just like that out of the blue with no warning. unless maybe if you had sex with the boss's wife
 

Facism

Gold Member
Hopefully it's just to chat about where you are and what help or resource you need to get to point where you can progress.
 

RiccochetJ

Gold Member
We just went over some emails that came in, nothing performance related. One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer
Was the "One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer" something your manager implied to you or was that you reprimanding yourself?
 

AJUMP23

Gold Member
Was the "One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer" something your manager implied to you or was that you reprimanding yourself?
He is doing it to himself. The management thinks he is doing fine, because they just went over work that was going on.
 
We just went over some emails that came in, nothing performance related. One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer

Stop putting pressure on yourself to be the "Best".

I don't know you, but when some people have too much pressure applied they "flee" rather than stay and "fight". Everyone WANTS to believe that they fight under pressure no matter what, but at a desk job it is especially easy to reduce the pressure by shrugging it off and procrastinating. If you do procrastinate, you could feel like you are not doing well enough (even if you are) because you feel guilty for not being a production machine.

Just focus on learning, ask questions, and if you need to organize a way to be more productive. If you know explicitly what it is that keeps you from being as productive as you imagine that you want to be, try to address it in a successful way.
 
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zeorhymer

Member
We just went over some emails that came in, nothing performance related. One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer
STOP.

That is not healthy or conducive for work growth. You mentioned that you're not too keen on the job. That this is your first career job. Trying to be a "top performer" in a job you don't like and brand new to the workforce will make you even more miserable. You need to work on getting caught up to speed with the position.

Set tasks for yourself to complete in order to progress the project. An example would be: we need a new vending machine. A task would be, call the vendor. Another task would be schedule for removal, etc. If the task you put are still not working, make it even smaller. Once you see that you're completing things, you'll get more confidence that you can get the job done. Once you do that, before you know it, you'll be in the flow of the job.

Only *after* you get the flow of the job, will you be able to set performance goals. You're not going to compete with other people, but going to compete with yourself. Don't look at your co-worker's numbers or clients or the dollars they bring in. Doing that will ultimately bring you down. You have to perform for yourself. I made a sale this week. Let's see if I can get 2 in the same time span. Oh no, my sales weren't great compared to last, what can I do to improve.

Remember, this is your first job. You're probably mid 20s. You have 40 some odd years to get other, better paying ones. Use this experience as a stepping stone for a job that you will ultimately like.
 

Maiden Voyage

Gold™ Member
STOP.

That is not healthy or conducive for work growth. You mentioned that you're not too keen on the job. That this is your first career job. Trying to be a "top performer" in a job you don't like and brand new to the workforce will make you even more miserable. You need to work on getting caught up to speed with the position.

Set tasks for yourself to complete in order to progress the project. An example would be: we need a new vending machine. A task would be, call the vendor. Another task would be schedule for removal, etc. If the task you put are still not working, make it even smaller. Once you see that you're completing things, you'll get more confidence that you can get the job done. Once you do that, before you know it, you'll be in the flow of the job.

Only *after* you get the flow of the job, will you be able to set performance goals. You're not going to compete with other people, but going to compete with yourself. Don't look at your co-worker's numbers or clients or the dollars they bring in. Doing that will ultimately bring you down. You have to perform for yourself. I made a sale this week. Let's see if I can get 2 in the same time span. Oh no, my sales weren't great compared to last, what can I do to improve.

Remember, this is your first job. You're probably mid 20s. You have 40 some odd years to get other, better paying ones. Use this experience as a stepping stone for a job that you will ultimately like.
Imagine giving this advice to a young Ash Ketchum. For shame.
Kermit The Frog Reaction GIF by Muppet Wiki
 

sircaw

Banned
Looking forward to the anticipation thread of your wedding night.

Performance-related issues and discussions about being a Top performer. "lollipop_disappointed:
 
STOP.

That is not healthy or conducive for work growth. You mentioned that you're not too keen on the job. That this is your first career job. Trying to be a "top performer" in a job you don't like and brand new to the workforce will make you even more miserable. You need to work on getting caught up to speed with the position.

Set tasks for yourself to complete in order to progress the project. An example would be: we need a new vending machine. A task would be, call the vendor. Another task would be schedule for removal, etc. If the task you put are still not working, make it even smaller. Once you see that you're completing things, you'll get more confidence that you can get the job done. Once you do that, before you know it, you'll be in the flow of the job.

Only *after* you get the flow of the job, will you be able to set performance goals. You're not going to compete with other people, but going to compete with yourself. Don't look at your co-worker's numbers or clients or the dollars they bring in. Doing that will ultimately bring you down. You have to perform for yourself. I made a sale this week. Let's see if I can get 2 in the same time span. Oh no, my sales weren't great compared to last, what can I do to improve.

Remember, this is your first job. You're probably mid 20s. You have 40 some odd years to get other, better paying ones. Use this experience as a stepping stone for a job that you will ultimately like.

Yes exactly.
 

Ownage

Member
Well if you were being fired they wouldn’t schedule a meeting with you ahead of time. They’d just do it and terminate your access and then inform you.
This.

At worst, you might be put on a PIP, or performance improvement plan. They want to help you succeed. They also want to document they tried to help you succeed but couldn't before letting you go. Liability is always of concern with employers.

Relax, amigo. You can reduce your anxiety by taking time in the off hours to learn skills you need. The worst battle you face is yourself - always.
 
We just went over some emails that came in, nothing performance related. One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer

"start becoming a top performer" what is that? For sure I can tell you, there is no high that is high enough for any boss. I have watched people in teams who are 95+ whatever they want, but it was not good enough, and their bosses wanted more. At that point you understand, all you need to do is your job, nothing less, nothing more. The day you give the "illusion" of 100%, no one will care, and it will be the day any boss can say you are not good enough for any job.
 

nush

Gold Member
One thing is clear, need to get out of my head, and start becoming a top performer

Nobody likes working with that new hire that's too easy to please the boss and trying to speed-run to a promotion. Just come to work, do the job at a steady pace, take time to check there's no mistakes in your work and ask more experienced employees for advice when needed. Repeat every day until an opportunity comes to move up or you take your experince to another company.
 

Northeastmonk

Gold Member
I know the feeling of meetings, especially those last minute ones where you can’t imagine what they are going to say. Worst thing to do is get mad and take everything personal. I’ve had terrible one on ones with bosses in the food and retail industries. When I first started out working and the managers made the young staff scared for their jobs. Things got better when I started my actual career. I started caring about what the manager said and what I actually did in a specific situation. There were a few times where I was judged unfairly by others and my boss didn’t really care. It was just dealing with real people and their own caddy personality. There were times when I really did mess up and I was spoken to about it. The best thing to do is tell the truth and be honest. Employers hate liars. I realized that if I am serious about my job, my boss won’t think I’m worthless to the company, instead they’ll see someone who wants to be with the company. I get compliments now, but I have had my share of nerve racking meetings before.

There’s a big difference between the person who messes up, but still cares about the job and a person who messes up and doesn’t care about their future with the company or getting better. A boss wants to invest in people they think cares.

I’ve seen people get hired who weren’t 100% qualified for the job, but their determination was there. An old boss of mine told me he’d rather hire someone who is good with people and understanding how to deal with problems than some amazing smart computer genius who isn’t good with people.
 

nush

Gold Member
I’ve had terrible one on ones with bosses in the food and retail industries. When I first started out working and the managers made the young staff scared for their jobs.

This is true, those entry level job supervisors and middle mangers tend more often than not to be absolute power-tripping, ladder climbing shithawks that enjoy nothing more than flexing on younger staff. What you need to know is they have reached the top of their working career and they will never get any higher than that. I've occasionally crossed paths with them years later and they were nothing. Whereas many collegues that were at my level actually became something.



The best thing to do is tell the truth and be honest.

However, don't do this on one of the entry level jobs because it's just an easy way for management to fuck you. Deny and lie, I learned this the hard way.

However being able to lie convincingly when needed is an uncomfortable business life skill. I've had bosses send me out to bullshit for them, I don't want to do it but to refuse would see my employment end pretty quickly "For a completely unrelated reason that just happened at the same time shortly after".
 
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