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Google is disappointing the Stadia community

CyberPanda

Banned
Mar 4, 2019
10,891
17,505
1,190
The company's focus on the future is letting down players today.

"This is fine."

Andrey Doronichev is in charge of gamer experience at Stadia, Google's fledgling cloud-gaming service. In a conversation with him about the company's confidence in Stadia three months post-launch, Doronichev was unflappable. Though players have been complaining about a lack of updates, technical issues, missing features and a dearth of new games, Doronichev argued the service was still new and Google had actually grown it significantly since launch. Besides, he said, it's not about the daily experience in the early days. It's about the end goal -- the 8K, lag-free, game-streaming utopia that Google promised when it debuted Stadia.

In other words, this is fine.

"This is great," Doronichev continued. "This is what this all about, right? It's not just about some marginal improvements, it's not about a specific feature. It's about a big, bold statement of where we are going. We're going there very, very confidently. So judging by the velocity so far, if anything, I'm more confident in our ability to deliver and over-deliver."

Before launch, Google outlined a litany of features that still haven't made their way to Stadia: family sharing, iOS support, hardware-free subscription options, social features, a consistent lineup of new games, and in browsers, 4K mode, Google Assistant functionality and wireless play with the Stadia controller. Same goes for mobile devices with that last one. Since launch, Google has expanded Stadia to all Chromecast Ultras (it was locked to Stadia-specific devices for a while), added achievements and dropped its first multiplayer feature, Stream Connect, into Ghost Recon Breakpoint. And, just this week, Google expanded Stadia to 18 new Android devices, meaning the service isn't exclusive to Pixel phones any longer.



Meanwhile, Stadia's competitors, Microsoft xCloud and NVIDIA's GeForce Now, support a broad swath of Android devices. GeForce Now runs on any Android device with at least 2GB of RAM and running Lollipop or higher, while xCloud works on Android phones with Bluetooth 4.0 and powered by Marshmallow or higher. Early reviews of these services are positive, even though xCloud is still in preview and GeForce Now has been live for less than a month (after seven years of beta testing, of course).


It feels like there's an asterisk after every bold claim Google makes about Stadia.


One reason GeForce Now and xCloud are reviewing well is their presentation -- NVIDIA and Microsoft are transparent about what the services can actually do. GeForce Now, for instance, is capped at 1080p and 60 FPS, while xCloud maxes out at 720p, since it's limited to mobile devices for now. Google, on the other hand, is leading with the message that Stadia can hit 4K and 60FPS, but this comes with a handful of caveats. Stadia's 4K capability is limited to TVs only, and the games that Google made the most noise about -- namely Red Dead Redemption 2 and Destiny 2 -- don't actually play in 4K. Google didn't make this distinction clear; players and critics had to figure out which titles actually supported 4K on their own.

Google also promised to add 120 games to the service in 2020, though it hasn't shared specific titles and has said it's "up to the publishers" to announce their Stadia fare. Players are left wondering whether their favorite franchises will launch on the platform, and when Google has revealed new Stadia titles, the list is consistently underwhelming.

It feels like there's an asterisk after every bold claim Google makes about Stadia, adding invisible barriers to a system that's supposed to be borderless. Seriously -- there are literal asterisks in every line on the Google Stadia homepage, and half the site is just footnotes.

So even though Google's focus with Stadia is on providing the best resolution of any streaming service out there, on PC it's technically on par with GeForce Now. And in reality, it tends to look worse because Google has locked down graphics customization on Stadia. And even though Google has a special relationship with major internet service providers, it's still running into technical issues that cause game-breaking lag, stuttering and dips in resolution. This isn't a surprise, considering there are more than 2,000 ISPs in the United States alone, and 70 percent of the country doesn't have access to fiber-optic, the fastest internet delivery system around. No matter how powerful Google is, it can't control the network in every Stadia player's home -- or on the bus, at the coffee shop, in the airport... you get the idea.


Before anything else, cloud gamers just want to play and forget they're streaming.


The problem is, Google wants to make it seem like it can. Google has promised more than it's delivered, and small tweaks to its messaging could make a massive difference. For instance, instead of selling 4K support and then having to explain why most Stadia streams aren't actually in 4K, Google could cap everything at 1080p, like NVIDIA. The company would dodge the criticism of games "only" hitting 1440p, while also putting less strain on a system that's still brand new.

"I'm super excited about the roadmap ahead of us," Doronichev said. "We went ahead announcing our vision, which is big, and it will take us time to get there."

Cloud gaming is designed for folks with an appetite for high-fidelity games, but who don't own a rig capable of playing these titles. In 2020, these players are simply looking for a stable entry point into the market, not a bleeding-edge graphics package. Before anything else, cloud gamers just want to play and forget they're streaming.

Today is the final day of the three-month free trial provided to Stadia players via the $130 Founder's Edition. From now on, players will have to pay $10 a month to access Stadia Pro, or stick with the free version, which doesn't support 4K or include access to free games. Then again, the Pro tier barely does either.


 
Nov 5, 2016
24,133
48,023
1,215
One Big Room, Full Of Bad Bitches
What Stadia community?
He gave up on it already.

in a week V Voost Kain gonna post a Stadia redemption thread and be like

 

DESTROYA

Member
Jan 1, 2011
10,039
15,344
1,200
USA
I’m usually not one to like seeing someone fail but the way Stadia set up everything was a joke to begin with, games are almost unplayable due to input lag and paying for games you never really own is laughable.
I don’t see Google supporting Stadia long term .
 
Aug 24, 2016
8,172
7,261
1,125
There are still backstock Ouya's at my local Target on clearance for $9.99 last time I checked, but I've never seen ONE Stadia on shelves in person.
 
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DonF

Member
Jul 10, 2017
4,152
4,706
470
Google is disappointing.

I'm a huge google guy, I was on the early list of gmail people, I've always had android phones, I own a chromebook, chromecast and use mostly chrome as a browser on my pc. But god damn is it a very disappointing company.

Like since their creation, all they've done is hype, but no results. Create a great service, fuck it up, abandon it, go for the next one. Every single android iteration has promises of new stuff and better battery life, yet here we are, with less functions and same battery life.

Most google products are a very good idea, but there is no communication between their projects. Why is a google app better on iphone than on android?! Why are all ipad google apps great, but shitty on android tablets?! its a very weird company that lacks tons of focus, but hey...most of their stuff is "free" as in, we collect all your personal data but free email! woo hoo
 

wolywood

Member
Aug 29, 2005
668
396
1,545
I like Stadia. I like the controller, snappy load times, and being able to jump into games in seconds just by opening up a new Chrome tab. I'm not going to pretend it's some magical streaming utopia, but I haven't experienced any lag or input issues playing games like Destiny or NBA2K20 over my decent (not amazing) home and office wifi networks.
xCloud is great too, from the little I've tried of the beta.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

sincarra

Member
Oct 5, 2019
70
179
230
But it’s okay, though. We’re getting some more free (old) games, and timed exclusives. Surely it’ll turn around Google Stadia into a behemoth that will overtake Sony’s crown.
 

Sir Vilhelm

Member
Jan 25, 2017
420
840
410
Laguna Niguel, CA
I know I'm in a lot of threads parroting the same thing but Streaming is not the future and Stadia could never succeed.

Cloud gaming and subscriptions will only ever be a tiny fraction of what the console market is....

Which is why I like Microsoft's approach. I would never give up consoles to go full streaming but to be able to demo a game without installation or stream while downloading new game. That is huge for me. So many games I want to try but waiting for the download then deciding it's not worth it is such a waste.

Also, being able to pick up where I left off on the go is pretty enjoyable.
 

darkinstinct

...lacks reading comprehension.
Jul 24, 2015
4,787
2,810
715
Switzerland
The company's focus on the future is letting down players today.

"This is fine."

Andrey Doronichev is in charge of gamer experience at Stadia, Google's fledgling cloud-gaming service. In a conversation with him about the company's confidence in Stadia three months post-launch, Doronichev was unflappable. Though players have been complaining about a lack of updates, technical issues, missing features and a dearth of new games, Doronichev argued the service was still new and Google had actually grown it significantly since launch. Besides, he said, it's not about the daily experience in the early days. It's about the end goal -- the 8K, lag-free, game-streaming utopia that Google promised when it debuted Stadia.

In other words, this is fine.

"This is great," Doronichev continued. "This is what this all about, right? It's not just about some marginal improvements, it's not about a specific feature. It's about a big, bold statement of where we are going. We're going there very, very confidently. So judging by the velocity so far, if anything, I'm more confident in our ability to deliver and over-deliver."

Before launch, Google outlined a litany of features that still haven't made their way to Stadia: family sharing, iOS support, hardware-free subscription options, social features, a consistent lineup of new games, and in browsers, 4K mode, Google Assistant functionality and wireless play with the Stadia controller. Same goes for mobile devices with that last one. Since launch, Google has expanded Stadia to all Chromecast Ultras (it was locked to Stadia-specific devices for a while), added achievements and dropped its first multiplayer feature, Stream Connect, into Ghost Recon Breakpoint. And, just this week, Google expanded Stadia to 18 new Android devices, meaning the service isn't exclusive to Pixel phones any longer.



Meanwhile, Stadia's competitors, Microsoft xCloud and NVIDIA's GeForce Now, support a broad swath of Android devices. GeForce Now runs on any Android device with at least 2GB of RAM and running Lollipop or higher, while xCloud works on Android phones with Bluetooth 4.0 and powered by Marshmallow or higher. Early reviews of these services are positive, even though xCloud is still in preview and GeForce Now has been live for less than a month (after seven years of beta testing, of course).


It feels like there's an asterisk after every bold claim Google makes about Stadia.


One reason GeForce Now and xCloud are reviewing well is their presentation -- NVIDIA and Microsoft are transparent about what the services can actually do. GeForce Now, for instance, is capped at 1080p and 60 FPS, while xCloud maxes out at 720p, since it's limited to mobile devices for now. Google, on the other hand, is leading with the message that Stadia can hit 4K and 60FPS, but this comes with a handful of caveats. Stadia's 4K capability is limited to TVs only, and the games that Google made the most noise about -- namely Red Dead Redemption 2 and Destiny 2 -- don't actually play in 4K. Google didn't make this distinction clear; players and critics had to figure out which titles actually supported 4K on their own.

Google also promised to add 120 games to the service in 2020, though it hasn't shared specific titles and has said it's "up to the publishers" to announce their Stadia fare. Players are left wondering whether their favorite franchises will launch on the platform, and when Google has revealed new Stadia titles, the list is consistently underwhelming.

It feels like there's an asterisk after every bold claim Google makes about Stadia, adding invisible barriers to a system that's supposed to be borderless. Seriously -- there are literal asterisks in every line on the Google Stadia homepage, and half the site is just footnotes.

So even though Google's focus with Stadia is on providing the best resolution of any streaming service out there, on PC it's technically on par with GeForce Now. And in reality, it tends to look worse because Google has locked down graphics customization on Stadia. And even though Google has a special relationship with major internet service providers, it's still running into technical issues that cause game-breaking lag, stuttering and dips in resolution. This isn't a surprise, considering there are more than 2,000 ISPs in the United States alone, and 70 percent of the country doesn't have access to fiber-optic, the fastest internet delivery system around. No matter how powerful Google is, it can't control the network in every Stadia player's home -- or on the bus, at the coffee shop, in the airport... you get the idea.


Before anything else, cloud gamers just want to play and forget they're streaming.


The problem is, Google wants to make it seem like it can. Google has promised more than it's delivered, and small tweaks to its messaging could make a massive difference. For instance, instead of selling 4K support and then having to explain why most Stadia streams aren't actually in 4K, Google could cap everything at 1080p, like NVIDIA. The company would dodge the criticism of games "only" hitting 1440p, while also putting less strain on a system that's still brand new.

"I'm super excited about the roadmap ahead of us," Doronichev said. "We went ahead announcing our vision, which is big, and it will take us time to get there."

Cloud gaming is designed for folks with an appetite for high-fidelity games, but who don't own a rig capable of playing these titles. In 2020, these players are simply looking for a stable entry point into the market, not a bleeding-edge graphics package. Before anything else, cloud gamers just want to play and forget they're streaming.

Today is the final day of the three-month free trial provided to Stadia players via the $130 Founder's Edition. From now on, players will have to pay $10 a month to access Stadia Pro, or stick with the free version, which doesn't support 4K or include access to free games. Then again, the Pro tier barely does either.



What free version? Google delayed the free version to "sometime in 2020". Only the paid version exists for the coming months.
 
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cryptoadam

Banned
Feb 21, 2018
24,155
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This thing died a lot faster than I expected. I thought they would get a year or 2 out of it, but it died basically on day 2.
 
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hunthunt

Banned
Mar 22, 2019
938
1,684
360
Chile
We are talking about a company that gets their profits by trafficking intimal data and selling focalized advertisement

They give zero fucks about what their services users think about it
 

Zefah

Gold Member
Jan 7, 2007
44,527
25,504
1,805
They're treating it like any other Google service and that's the problem. The company's culture and way of doing things just isn't compatible with the industry they're trying to get in and they aren't willing to change.
 
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Justin9mm

Member
May 9, 2018
1,474
1,093
375
Melbourne, Australia
I like Stadia. I like the controller, snappy load times, and being able to jump into games in seconds just by opening up a new Chrome tab. I'm not going to pretend it's some magical streaming utopia, but I haven't experienced any lag or input issues playing games like Destiny or NBA2K20 over my decent (not amazing) home and office wifi networks.
xCloud is great too, from the little I've tried of the beta.
Input lag is not some magical made up fairytale.. You have to have some lag because it's physically impossible not to. Are you one of those people that can't tell the difference between 1080p and 4K?
 

ethomaz

is mad because DF didn't do a video on a video of a video of a video on PS5
Mar 19, 2013
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You can’t disappoint something you don’t have yet.
 
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junguler

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even if the internet infrastructure around the world was there for streaming to be viable and the data caps were none-existent, google's offerings is laughable when compared to xcloud, geforce_now or even ps_now. pc/console gamers are not pushovers like the mobile/tablet market and they don't seem to care about stadia at all.
 

Woo-Fu

incest on the subway
Jan 2, 2007
18,633
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Next time the Google candy van rolls through town you won't be so quick to get in.
 
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The Shepard

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Jan 7, 2018
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Whether your xbox, playstation,
Nintendo or pc we can all agree on one thing, we don't want or need stadia, it can go and do one.
 
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newtypepilot

Member
Aug 19, 2015
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what community?

You can't be disappointed at something that was obviously gonna fail on day1, especially from a company that has a reputation of abandoning its services.
 
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LMJ

Member
Feb 7, 2019
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A community needs to exist to disappoint it ;)

But yeah, who (besides V Voost Kain ) didnt see this coming a mile away, Google entered this thing half assed from the get go...
 
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diffusionx

Member
Feb 25, 2006
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A community needs to exist to disappoint it ;)

But yeah, who (besides V Voost Kain ) didnt see this coming a mile away, Google entered this thing half assed from the get go...
Stadia reddit is great. It’s like they are going through the five stages of grief. Denial (people just don’t get how great this is, here’s a picture of me playing Destiny 2 at the pool), anger (N days without updates WTF Google), bargaining (I’m going to quit my Stadia Pro account to teach them a lesson), depression (google has failed us)... but now I think they’re starting to accept their service sucks and Google doesn’t give a shit about anything they can’t use to spy on you, but let’s try to enjoy it.
 
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xrnzaaas

Member
Dec 9, 2013
11,714
5,601
785
The whole situation with Stadia is really weird, Google acted like they were some new start-up trying to sell an impossible dream and then spectacularly failing to deliver (with the technology, game lineup and the business model). For fuck's sake they're one of the biggest companies in the world and they should be able to handle this launch much better.
 
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Grinchy

Member
Aug 3, 2010
27,720
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My favorite fake feature is the predictive inputs. They are pretending that they can make it so Stadia can predict the button you're going to press before you press it. This would eliminate the lag that comes from the back-and-forth communication because it has already done what you were going to do...

People bought into this.
 
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