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Community GAF Musicians Community

What is your musical talent? (select 2 or more)

  • Stringman: I play violin, guitar, bass, mandolin, ukulele, etc

    Votes: 10 52.6%
  • Keys: I play piano, synthesizers, organ, electric piano, etc

    Votes: 6 31.6%
  • Woodwind: I fancy myself a flautist, sax player, clarinet, etc

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Brass: I'm noisy and play trumpet, french horn, tuba, trombone, etc

    Votes: 2 10.5%
  • Percussion: I like to hit things...drums, toms, congas, tambourine, etc

    Votes: 6 31.6%
  • Voice: I like to sing professionally, in my car, in the shower, in karaoke, in chorus, etc

    Votes: 5 26.3%
  • Programmer: I have a knack for producing, engineering music, I'm good with MIDI, etc

    Votes: 6 31.6%
  • Collector: I don't play anything but I listen to and collect a ton of music

    Votes: 1 5.3%
  • Songwriter: I don't always play but I can write lyrics, poetry, etc

    Votes: 3 15.8%

  • Total voters
    19
  • Poll closed .

Happosai

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GAF Musicians Community

I've noticed that many members on NeoGaf have various talents or skills that span beyond gaming. I thought to myself...maybe we need a place for those musicians to freely share their music (freely also means no charging money for music). We're going to get this started with a poll. What kind of musical talent are you? Everyone should select at least one but you have options up to 4 poll choices. If you're a multi-musician...share with us your gift.

There are many threads already for those who just want to share the music you like in a YouTube video link; however, let's try to keep this to your original music. If you have videos of yourself jamming, practicing, or studio recordings...by all means, share them! Tell us what got you started into music and what musical genre (s) you prefer to play. Were you a band geek in high school or college? If you're not a musician...what's a musical instrument you want to learn? Not certain about what instrument brands, types, and such you should buy/rent? Ask us here (just no advertisements...only references). Do you like to play original songs or covers? What instruments do you own (even if you don't play them)...share pics if you like?

Keep it simple and within NeoGAF guidelines and I'd say we have the making for a great thread here!

About me: I'm a multi-musician and I started playing brass at like age 9. At age 10, I switched to percussion and played until I was 11 before switching to guitar. I had piano lessons at age 6 but never learned anything back then beyond middle-C; I came back to piano when I was 15-years old and it's one of my main instruments. I started playing flutes (concert, shakuhachi, hulusi, ocarina, Irish, pan, etc) when I was in college in my later-teens. I started playing electric bass and double-bass when I was 21. I also play: mandolin, marimba, drums, percussion, auto-harp, saxophone, melodica, harmonica, organ (I've got a vintage Hammond), dulcimer, dobro, steel guitar, and timpani. I suck at writing lyrics and have an extreme shyness of singing. I love gaming soundtracks, anime soundtracks, instrumentals, and play music written before my time mostly. Here are a few tracks I've written or played multiple instruments on (free to listen to):

Electronic music (written mostly on MIDI...I love using obscure time signatures and loops)


Peruvian sounding music (flutes, classic guitar)


Jazz (The other musicians didn't show and I ended up playing all instruments)


Folk cover (this is not my song and is the most you'll hear of me singing)


Funk-fusion


Electronic soundtrack


Anime cover (Harlock Saga ending)

 

Rock And Roll

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Great thread idea!

I'm a professional musician based out of Toronto, Canada. I started playing drums when I was 9, started to take it seriously around 15 and pursued music as a career. Went to one of those expensive music schools before dropping out because I was pretty much gigging and teaching full time. I gigged in original and cover acts across Canada and the USA before doing the hotel circuit in Asia for about a year and a half. Started working cruise ships after that before coming back home for the past few years. I was about to go back on ships but then corona hit.

I also play guitar, bass, keys/piano and sing. Did trumpet and flute in high school but haven't played either in years. I started messing around with music production at the start of the new year and quarantine turned out to be very productive for me to learn a new skill. I've been recording covers by myself and mixing them, and am also taking an online mixing course which I'm learning a lot from. Just another nice skill to have in my bag of tricks I suppose. I'm going to record an album once I feel my production skills have improved to the point of my mixes sounding radio ready.
 

Happosai

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Great thread idea!

I'm a professional musician based out of Toronto, Canada. I started playing drums when I was 9, started to take it seriously around 15 and pursued music as a career. Went to one of those expensive music schools before dropping out because I was pretty much gigging and teaching full time. I gigged in original and cover acts across Canada and the USA before doing the hotel circuit in Asia for about a year and a half. Started working cruise ships after that before coming back home for the past few years. I was about to go back on ships but then corona hit.

I also play guitar, bass, keys/piano and sing. Did trumpet and flute in high school but haven't played either in years. I started messing around with music production at the start of the new year and quarantine turned out to be very productive for me to learn a new skill. I've been recording covers by myself and mixing them, and am also taking an online mixing course which I'm learning a lot from. Just another nice skill to have in my bag of tricks I suppose. I'm going to record an album once I feel my production skills have improved to the point of my mixes sounding radio ready.
Percussion is something I admire but am not the greatest in. Sorry to hear the guys were shut down due to the virus. Sounds like you're multi-musical, too. Which instrument comes second in line when you're not playing percussion? Ever listen to Bill Bruford, Carl Palmer, or Simon Phillips? If I were interning as a percussion major...I'd follow their work. Good luck with production! It's tougher than it looks but it can be fun in the studio.
 

Rock And Roll

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Percussion is something I admire but am not the greatest in. Sorry to hear the guys were shut down due to the virus. Sounds like you're multi-musical, too. Which instrument comes second in line when you're not playing percussion? Ever listen to Bill Bruford, Carl Palmer, or Simon Phillips? If I were interning as a percussion major...I'd follow their work. Good luck with production! It's tougher than it looks but it can be fun in the studio.

I'd say I'm pretty equal skill wise when it comes to piano/guitar. Able to play those pretty slkid but nothing flashy, I don't have serious chops on either but I do practice the odd thing here and there to keep progressing at a snails pace. I was actually going to go back on ships as the pub guitarist, just solo acoustic sets each night. I got into singing by learning how to sing harmonies, then over time singers started saying "you should sing a song", then that evolved into "sing a few songs so I can take a smoke break". Eventually I started to play solo acoustic gigs on the side because the money is better and I don't have to lug a kit around.

And yeah, I've listened to those guys. I've never been too big into prog stuff aside from guys like Danny Carey from Tool and Jon Theodore from the Mars Volta but I recognize the talent and have learned some of their licks here and there. Bruford has a lot of cool paradiddle groove/fill sticking ideas which I occasionally will shamelessly steal :p
 

Happosai

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As a musician it pisses me off when soundtrack artists and even those who write jingles for commercials don't put effort into it. Around about 2010 this new hipster-style music started to become trendy. You know what I'm talking about? It's literally in every T.V. commercial / advert you hear.

Commercial music was a bit flaky in the 70's and 80's but someone had to write and compose that type of music. So, this is what we're hearing in everything today. For the record this cheap hipster whistling, clapping, ukulele crap is being used in everything (including TV shows and movies). Here's the nauseating sample:


After 10-second of that, you need to ask yourself questions as a musician or music fan. Who writes this crap? Why is it all the same? Why is this now a new form of pop music (if the whole synth-autotune-pop of the 2010's wasn't bad enough)? I might have an answer but I'm not going to dis this guy too much.

Sir Paul McCartney. Yeah, he wrote a song demonstrating how-not to play a mandolin (playing it ukulele style) that quickly picked up and got a lot of airplay. I remember hearing this song quite frequently from Starbucks stock music when I lived in the States. Paul McCartney is a great multi-musician and song writer. He's written some amazing songs and is one of maybe 7 English musicians to have mastered the "sale formula" for song writing. Having such a big influence leads me to believe that the below song he wrote had somewhat of an influence on this new retard-pop music (the whole whistling, clapping, uke crap) that we're hearing on everything. I don't think McCartney intended to make this a thing but it became commercial overnight and since the 2010's you literally hear this crap in everything. It's worse when a guy or girl is trying to sing to it. The singing is usually flat, nasally, monotone whisper-singing.



Thoughts? Opinions musicians?
 

Dark Star

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Jan 14, 2018
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Hello, everyone!

I just released my album, Coffin Music, today (October 1st)

1.) 0:00 THE SKELETON KEY
2.) 6:10 SEASON OF THE WITCH
3.) 9:28 HAUNTED HOUSE
4.) 12:58 FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE
5.) 17:20 KING OF DEMONS
6.) 21:12 PHANTOM OF THE NIGHT
7.) 24:52 MURDER ON GRAY STREET
8.) 29:43 GHOST STORIES
9.) 35:33 FEVER DREAM

Give it a listen if you'd like trap beats with heavy 808's and dark synths

 

Rock And Roll

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Sep 28, 2014
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As a musician it pisses me off when soundtrack artists and even those who write jingles for commercials don't put effort into it. Around about 2010 this new hipster-style music started to become trendy. You know what I'm talking about? It's literally in every T.V. commercial / advert you hear.

Commercial music was a bit flaky in the 70's and 80's but someone had to write and compose that type of music. So, this is what we're hearing in everything today. For the record this cheap hipster whistling, clapping, ukulele crap is being used in everything (including TV shows and movies). Here's the nauseating sample:


After 10-second of that, you need to ask yourself questions as a musician or music fan. Who writes this crap? Why is it all the same? Why is this now a new form of pop music (if the whole synth-autotune-pop of the 2010's wasn't bad enough)? I might have an answer but I'm not going to dis this guy too much.

Sir Paul McCartney. Yeah, he wrote a song demonstrating how-not to play a mandolin (playing it ukulele style) that quickly picked up and got a lot of airplay. I remember hearing this song quite frequently from Starbucks stock music when I lived in the States. Paul McCartney is a great multi-musician and song writer. He's written some amazing songs and is one of maybe 7 English musicians to have mastered the "sale formula" for song writing. Having such a big influence leads me to believe that the below song he wrote had somewhat of an influence on this new retard-pop music (the whole whistling, clapping, uke crap) that we're hearing on everything. I don't think McCartney intended to make this a thing but it became commercial overnight and since the 2010's you literally hear this crap in everything. It's worse when a guy or girl is trying to sing to it. The singing is usually flat, nasally, monotone whisper-singing.



Thoughts? Opinions musicians?

It's super annoying hearing it for every commercial. It is peak laziness and takes zero effort to write. I think if you get good at writing jingles, people are going to take notice since they get stuck in your head and then advertising people are going to start asking "hey who wrote that jingle for X?" You can seriously grow your bank account too if you write a jingle that sticks around for a decade or so because you just get royalties everytime it airs. Meanwhile if you just whistle and clap it gets lost in the background and no one cares.

Interestingly enough I feel the same thing could be said about music in games over the past 2 decades. It's become more and more forgettable because composers are writing stuff as background music and not something central to the games.
 

Happosai

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It's super annoying hearing it for every commercial. It is peak laziness and takes zero effort to write. I think if you get good at writing jingles, people are going to take notice since they get stuck in your head and then advertising people are going to start asking "hey who wrote that jingle for X?" You can seriously grow your bank account too if you write a jingle that sticks around for a decade or so because you just get royalties everytime it airs. Meanwhile if you just whistle and clap it gets lost in the background and no one cares.

Interestingly enough I feel the same thing could be said about music in games over the past 2 decades. It's become more and more forgettable because composers are writing stuff as background music and not something central to the games.
Soundtracks have been dwindling into nothing, too. Film scores that were written by something more than a few piano arpeggios mixed with MIDI simply don't exist now. MOVIES ALSO USE THE WHISTLE CLAP CRAP! Not to mention degenerate music like dub-step winding its way into soundtracks, advertising, and other visual media.

Were my speculations that Paul McCartney's "Dance Tonight" may have had something to do with this whistling wiener music that seems to have vomited itself on every form of video media in the past decade?

I'd love it if they went back to writing jingles because it made commercial advertisement seem like it was still part of creative film work.
 
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M1chl

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I am producing EDM, mainly trance, I am not that good even after like a million years of doing it, so I am mainly co-producing music and also helping writing lyrics and shit. I also trying to play piano better then I do now, however it's tough.
 

Happosai

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I am producing EDM, mainly trance, I am not that good even after like a million years of doing it, so I am mainly co-producing music and also helping writing lyrics and shit. I also trying to play piano better then I do now, however it's tough.
Feel free to share the music, software or hardware you use, etc. What got you into playing? Did you start with keys?
 

M1chl

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Feel free to share the music, software or hardware you use, etc. What got you into playing? Did you start with keys?
I only play on keys having M-Audio Axiom 49 Pro, which is nice keyboard, I guess. Then my daw of choise is Ableton, however I am experimenting with connection of Propellerhead Reason to Ableton live. I mainly work with Roxanne Emery and sometimes with her brother. So my music where I controbuted are listed here:


(Main lead, lyrics /with Roxanne E./ and delivering vocalist)


(My life story and lyrics and the piano intro)


(Lyrics with Christinna Novelli and Roxanne Emery)


(Lyrics with Christinna N.)


(Main Lead idea, which was then edited further by Gareth Emery)

Well these are the notable ones.

Have some more in the pipeline and sadly I have to sit on my ass and cannot fly to UK, to do it personally.

Also my absolute favorite vst synth is Reveal Sound Spire and best vst for learning how it works is Synapse Audio Dune 1 and Dune 3 is best for doing basslines.
 
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Happosai

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I only play on keys having M-Audio Axiom 49 Pro, which is nice keyboard, I guess. Then my daw of choise is Ableton, however I am experimenting with connection of Propellerhead Reason to Ableton live. I mainly work with Roxanne Emery and sometimes with her brother. So my music where I controbuted are listed here:


(Main lead, lyrics /with Roxanne E./ and delivering vocalist)


(My life story and lyrics and the piano intro)


(Lyrics with Christinna Novelli and Roxanne Emery)


(Lyrics with Christinna N.)


(Main Lead idea, which was then edited further by Gareth Emery)

Well these are the notable ones.

Have some more in the pipeline and sadly I have to sit on my ass and cannot fly to UK, to do it personally.

Also my absolute favorite vst synth is Reveal Sound Spire and best vst for learning how it works is Synapse Audio Dune 1 and Dune 3 is best for doing basslines.
You have a great talent and the work sounds professional enough to where you could probably market it toward growing businesses.
 

Rock And Roll

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Alright Musician-GAF I humbly ask you for assistance in improving my mixes. I've only been at this for a few months but I feel like I'm hitting a wall and need some good ears to help me progress. Here's a few mixes I've done using free multitracks on the Cambridge site

Jpop? Song

Indie rock song

Don't hesitate to tell me what's wrong with these mixes, you don't get better in this industry without harsh criticism. I need some ears with a lot of experience to help me out here!
 
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Happosai

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Alright Musician-GAF I humbly ask you for assistance in improving my mixes. I've only been at this for a few months but I feel like I'm hitting a wall and need some good ears to help me progress. Here's a few mixes I've done using free multitracks on the Cambridge site

Jpop? Song

Indie rock song

Don't hesitate to tell me what's wrong with these mixes, you don't get better in this industry without harsh criticism. I need some ears with a lot of experience to help me out here!
I've a bit more time tomorrow morning to check the tracks. You may also share pictures of the WAV editor and software screens so I can check the details. A quick tip, don't believe modern studio recorders who recommend 33.1 kilohertz to master tracks. Stick with 44-48 kHz / 24-bit for masters.
 

Happosai

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Alright Musician-GAF I humbly ask you for assistance in improving my mixes. I've only been at this for a few months but I feel like I'm hitting a wall and need some good ears to help me progress. Here's a few mixes I've done using free multitracks on the Cambridge site

Jpop? Song

Indie rock song

Don't hesitate to tell me what's wrong with these mixes, you don't get better in this industry without harsh criticism. I need some ears with a lot of experience to help me out here!
From just a listen I can say that the tracks are recorded generally at medium-medium high quality for demos. I'm not a producer and won't pretend to be. However, I had to work with a 65-year old friend of mine for many years who is a producer and musical engineer. Rather than criticize the work (the work itself is very clean-cut sounding and is far above most audio people share to me on SoundCloud).

If the mixes are not yet complete but you need help; I'll need a screenshot of one of the RAW files with all of the inputs. I also need to ask the following:

Are you using a DAC for the master?
Are you trying for lossless for the master?
Are you mixing 44.1 kHz for 16-bit or 24-bit?
Before mixing are you making sure you have the purest DAC first?
Which instruments, samples, etc do you want driving the track? Low-end bass / rhythmic sections? High-end treble tones or voices?

As long as you haven't published the tracks and you still have the RAW source arrangement files, you can still return and do this. You need to organize in writing either by chart or otherwise how you want the final mix to sound. Listen to the different tracks in the multi-track mix and pick which ones you want enhanced. Don't master to 16 or 24-bit / 44.1 kHz until you have this sorted out or it may result in a poorer quality FLAC or WAV. I cannot stress enough...DO NOT COMPRESS YOUR SOURCE FILES BEFORE OR AFTER THE MASTER! Compression may be nice if you're trying to save memory on your hard drive but it destroys music and it's the reason why generally great instrumental music will go completely unnoticed by any audience. MP3's, AiC, and other compressed file-types are a big NO in professional recording. Don't even offer to sell people the music in MP3 format unless you have a higher-quality WAV to offer to the customer and the H.Q. MP3 is only being used to promote tracks.

Not much criticism but I would recommend that you bring up the rhythmic section on the tracks and be very selective about percussive pieces complimenting bass synthesizers or bass guitars. This helps by cutting down on the typical snare - hi-hat - bass kick percussion. The catchiest rhythmic sections are ones which few artists are utilizing now. They focus on soft gated reverb and focus the percussion to the toms only with softer bass kick. Try to substitute cymbals with claps, reversed cymbals, or tambourine. Let the bass tracks ride synchronized with each beat of the toms and bass. Having that basic fundamental down, you can start adding back the vocal tracks, instrumental, and effects if you're going to use them. Try using only light reverb on vocals and focus more on getting the stereo mix corrected on vocals and instruments. Slight echo is okay for vocals when as long as it's not used during non-instrumental sections. Also try to reduce call-response vocals or choral repetitions. To surprise the listener (if you're going to use repeat chants to verses or choral lines), add quick-fades to those repetitions and try use them only a couple times per track.

I'm a big supporter of how Steve Lillywhite produced albums in the late-70's and early-80's. He knew that if the music was going to sell to focus on the rhythmic sessions. In the case with the Scottish-English band Big Country, he put 46 mics on the drum kit alone during the 1983 Crossing recording sessions. Many guitarists will start creating tracks percussion first and put their signature instrument on last.


Here's an example of a track with "fat" percussion, bass, and poor mixing. This producer recorded these tracks in 1982 for Big Country's debut album and was fired before completing. The percussion writing was nice and the bass was flowing. However, that doesn't change the fact that this is not commercial quality and this was supposed to be a master...not a demo. So, Steve Lillywhite got hired to re-record everything in 1983 and this is why he did to help this same song. They had to demo about 10 versions before finding the right master. This often happened with the young Lillywhite getting up to move things around on the drum kit and remix the bass several times. The guitars and vocals were added last.


The percussion and bass are much smoother and mixed not to overpower the other instruments but to add a complete and noticeably better rhythmic section.
 
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Rock And Roll

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Wow thanks for the detailed response! I'll try to answer to the best of my ability, some of the stuff I'm not sure of so I had to google it :p

Are you using a DAC for the master? No, I'm mixing entirely in the box right now.
Are you trying for lossless for the master? Had to google what this was so I'm going to lean towards no. My knowledge of mastering is extremely limited currently, I really only aim for loudness and try to add more dynamic to the track. I often don't use a compressor on the mastering chain unless it helps the mix noticeably.
Are you mixing 44.1 kHz for 16-bit or 24-bit? 44.1 kHz at 24 bit. Although I am doing a track right now on 16 bit. It all depends on whatever files/audio I get for the session.
Before mixing are you making sure you have the purest DAC first? Not sure on this one, as stated above, I only use whatever files I get. I use Cambridge Multitrack Library to find this stuff to practice on so I have no idea how these songs are recorded/produced etc...
Which instruments, samples, etc do you want driving the track? Low-end bass / rhythmic sections? High-end treble tones or voices? Generally the mixes are what I want them to sound like in terms of what will drive the track (example, Japan Song I wanted the bass/drums to be back a bit, the guitars to be way forward and the vocal to fit in the middle). I'm good at getting the overall shape of everything, it's just the finer details I have to learn now to create more space/contrast and make my mixes sound fuller.

Not much criticism but I would recommend that you bring up the rhythmic section on the tracks and be very selective about percussive pieces complimenting bass synthesizers or bass guitars. This helps by cutting down on the typical snare - hi-hat - bass kick percussion. The catchiest rhythmic sections are ones which few artists are utilizing now. They focus on soft gated reverb and focus the percussion to the toms only with softer bass kick. Try to substitute cymbals with claps, reversed cymbals, or tambourine. Let the bass tracks ride synchronized with each beat of the toms and bass.

I only use what is provided in the sessions but I think I should try to get a sample library or some triggers and mess around with them in the mixes. I am a drummer mainly by trade so I always lean towards a full drum sound (it just makes the track pump more IMO) but I have mixed some pop/EDM stuff before where I had to use more non-traditional percussion elements to create the beat for the song. It would probably be a good idea to try more tracks like that as I find it a lot harder to get the beat really breathing/pumping when using claps/snaps/shakers etc... as opposed to the regular drums/cymbals approach.

Try using only light reverb on vocals and focus more on getting the stereo mix corrected on vocals and instruments. Slight echo is okay for vocals when as long as it's not used during non-instrumental sections. Also try to reduce call-response vocals or choral repetitions. To surprise the listener (if you're going to use repeat chants to verses or choral lines), add quick-fades to those repetitions and try use them only a couple times per track.

This is another area I'm pretty bad at but sort of by choice at this point. I really want to get comfortable with EQ/Compression before I start going hard with the FX and whatnot. The good news is I feel like my mixes are starting to sound pretty sharp by the time I am done the EQ/Compression stage so now is the time to start learning how to use Reverb/Delay/Other FX to add some texture to my mixes. I am taking a course with Michael White (best known for Whitney Houston) and it's helped me out tremendously. It's the bootcamp program which he just started this year. I signed up a couple weeks late so I'm a bit behind the actual course but in a few weeks I'm starting the 3rd quarter which focuses a lot of FX processing, so that should get me headed in the right direction. Japan Song was the first time I ever tried to do delay throws, they sounded a bit sloppy and I wasn't going to pull my hair out trying to get it perfect, but it was a good concept for me to try out.

And if you're interested in what I use in terms of DAW/plugins etc... I am using Cubase 10 (I was on 10.5 but it seems buggy as hell so I went back down for the time being). I mainly use Slate Digital plugins for the majority of my mixes with some Waves plugins and stock plugins as well just to create more tonal differences between different elements. I'm also mixing on Sennheiser 600s and my room isn't acoustically treated, which is why I have a lot of problems with the low end sounding nice (also combined with inexperience on my part). I use the Abbey Road Studio plugin from Waves as it really helps when I'm mixing so it doesn't sound flat, but I really wish I lived in a place where I could use proper monitors. Oh, and I should mention I've been mixing in mono for the past couple months for about 80% of the mix. I find it really helps me get all the elements in the mix carved out since you can't just pan stuff hard left or right and forget about it. It really makes you aware of if certain things are masking other parts of the track.
 
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Happosai

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Wow thanks for the detailed response! I'll try to answer to the best of my ability, some of the stuff I'm not sure of so I had to google it :p

Are you using a DAC for the master? No, I'm mixing entirely in the box right now.
Are you trying for lossless for the master? Had to google what this was so I'm going to lean towards no. My knowledge of mastering is extremely limited currently, I really only aim for loudness and try to add more dynamic to the track. I often don't use a compressor on the mastering chain unless it helps the mix noticeably.
Are you mixing 44.1 kHz for 16-bit or 24-bit? 44.1 kHz at 24 bit. Although I am doing a track right now on 16 bit. It all depends on whatever files/audio I get for the session.
Before mixing are you making sure you have the purest DAC first? Not sure on this one, as stated above, I only use whatever files I get. I use Cambridge Multitrack Library to find this stuff to practice on so I have no idea how these songs are recorded/produced etc...
Which instruments, samples, etc do you want driving the track? Low-end bass / rhythmic sections? High-end treble tones or voices? Generally the mixes are what I want them to sound like in terms of what will drive the track (example, Japan Song I wanted the bass/drums to be back a bit, the guitars to be way forward and the vocal to fit in the middle). I'm good at getting the overall shape of everything, it's just the finer details I have to learn now to create more space/contrast and make my mixes sound fuller.

Not much criticism but I would recommend that you bring up the rhythmic section on the tracks and be very selective about percussive pieces complimenting bass synthesizers or bass guitars. This helps by cutting down on the typical snare - hi-hat - bass kick percussion. The catchiest rhythmic sections are ones which few artists are utilizing now. They focus on soft gated reverb and focus the percussion to the toms only with softer bass kick. Try to substitute cymbals with claps, reversed cymbals, or tambourine. Let the bass tracks ride synchronized with each beat of the toms and bass.

I only use what is provided in the sessions but I think I should try to get a sample library or some triggers and mess around with them in the mixes. I am a drummer mainly by trade so I always lean towards a full drum sound (it just makes the track pump more IMO) but I have mixed some pop/EDM stuff before where I had to use more non-traditional percussion elements to create the beat for the song. It would probably be a good idea to try more tracks like that as I find it a lot harder to get the beat really breathing/pumping when using claps/snaps/shakers etc... as opposed to the regular drums/cymbals approach.

Try using only light reverb on vocals and focus more on getting the stereo mix corrected on vocals and instruments. Slight echo is okay for vocals when as long as it's not used during non-instrumental sections. Also try to reduce call-response vocals or choral repetitions. To surprise the listener (if you're going to use repeat chants to verses or choral lines), add quick-fades to those repetitions and try use them only a couple times per track.

This is another area I'm pretty bad at but sort of by choice at this point. I really want to get comfortable with EQ/Compression before I start going hard with the FX and whatnot. The good news is I feel like my mixes are starting to sound pretty sharp by the time I am done the EQ/Compression stage so now is the time to start learning how to use Reverb/Delay/Other FX to add some texture to my mixes. I am taking a course with Michael White (best known for Whitney Houston) and it's helped me out tremendously. It's the bootcamp program which he just started this year. I signed up a couple weeks late so I'm a bit behind the actual course but in a few weeks I'm starting the 3rd quarter which focuses a lot of FX processing, so that should get me headed in the right direction. Japan Song was the first time I ever tried to do delay throws, they sounded a bit sloppy and I wasn't going to pull my hair out trying to get it perfect, but it was a good concept for me to try out.

And if you're interested in what I use in terms of DAW/plugins etc... I am using Cubase 10 (I was on 10.5 but it seems buggy as hell so I went back down for the time being). I mainly use Slate Digital plugins for the majority of my mixes with some Waves plugins and stock plugins as well just to create more tonal differences between different elements. I'm also mixing on Sennheiser 600s and my room isn't acoustically treated, which is why I have a lot of problems with the low end sounding nice (also combined with inexperience on my part). I use the Abbey Road Studio plugin from Waves as it really helps when I'm mixing so it doesn't sound flat, but I really wish I lived in a place where I could use proper monitors. Oh, and I should mention I've been mixing in mono for the past couple months for about 80% of the mix. I find it really helps me get all the elements in the mix carved out since you can't just pan stuff hard left or right and forget about it. It really makes you aware of if certain things are masking other parts of the track.
It really depends on your preference for the music. The catchy part of music is actually not becoming part of the "loudness wars." I know people want WAVs being converted to higher out-put MP3 but it's not what the buyers or studios are after. To get studio attention, they want to hear the rhythmic section done well. Once a song is published, it's difficult if not sometimes impossible to fix any mistakes at that time. That's why, you have to work with the RAW files strenuously until you hear them exactly how they need to be. If you're recording long hours, take breaks from the monitors and mixers. Just 10-minutes outside away from your console will refresh the mind so that you're able to go back and listen to things again to see if there's anything more you can do to fix it. If you ever get to masters, try to save in Lossless (FLAC). The FLAC is what big shots will want or if someone wants to remix your material (obviously paying your royalities); they'll need the final arrangement files and a FLAC to hear the pure audio. This is sorta cheating (I did it too)...you can record many things in mono and sneak stereo by-pass filters onto those sequences to simulate stereo. The only catch is that real professional producers will hear the difference.

Share the progress as things move along! Sounds got so far!
 
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Happosai

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I was just thinking the other day based on reading music posts from GAF members and what people living in the 2010's/20's play the most when I'm going about work or in public:


- A vast majority of GAF members seems to have an attachment to 90's-early 2000's alternative rock and hybrid rock music such as: Breaking Benjamin, Linkin Park, etc.

- A larger group seems to still thing heavy metal from either the 80's-present actually sounds good. No offense, but I always placed death/scream/gore metal into the same category as country, rap, and polka.

- The majority around me are confirmists and will listen to any popular...pop/rock from any given decade and can literally be categorized either by a cheap soundtrack they heard or by an individual song. I nearly killed my co-workers for attempting to triple play "Guardians of the Galaxy Awesome Mix" a few weeks ago. It's nothing but the trashiest, wimp rock, and cliched "hits" of the 70's and reflects more how some loser in Disney pictured they could try to bring culture to their audience. What a horrible selection of singers...I'm surprised they didn't cliche it further and put "Tiny Dancer," "The Smoker," and "Sweet Home Alabama" in there; it would have gone Diamond with those trash karaoke hits. With the conformists there's also an obsession with "Take on Me" by A-Ha. I'll give them this..."The Sun Always Shines on T.V." is okay for 2 listens before getting old but Take on Me is a type of repetition I hear everywhere that even molded one of the new "hits" (to which I have no idea the name of this obnoxious song...I've only seen the music video which is of some idiot wearing a red jacket with fake bandages on his face).

- The last category is one that I have the pleasure of not meeting many people locally here in Mexico that are obsessed with. This was more an annoyance I heard daily at coffee shops and colleges back in Illinoiis. This is the indie/folk/pop fan group or basically "coffee shop music." The singers often sing about left-wing political jargon, play ukelele's, acoustic guitars, and will obnoxiously whistle or just repeat "oh-oh-oh's." They also all tend to sing in either a monotone, with a scratchy voice, or something nasally.

If your music genre isn't there...congratulations! You're a minority music listener. You're not following the masses and are likely a musician yourself!

Just made this post for the fun of it and I don't condemn anyone who listens to those genres.
 

DunDunDunpachi

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Can someone recommend a resource (I'd prefer anything except an app, if possible) to practice my scales, do drills for scales, etc on 6 string guitar? I would like to noodle around and build up my callouses and finger flexibility again.
 

Bridges

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Can someone recommend a resource (I'd prefer anything except an app, if possible) to practice my scales, do drills for scales, etc on 6 string guitar? I would like to noodle around and build up my callouses and finger flexibility again.
Might not be what you're looking for since it's a videogame, but Rocksmith 2014 is great for this
 

Happosai

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Name a musician who inspired you - that may not be a virtuoso (maybe even far from it); someone who is average but respectfully good at what they write/play. Here's mine:

Growing up listening to Neil Young made me adapt some of his piano, harmonica, and acoustic guitar playing techniques. Some people think he sucks at guitar but it's a personal skill set he taught himself and was happy with. The part I noticed that I do when just playing basic chord-driven songs on acoustic guitar is pounding out the tempo (back beats) with the back of my hand to the bridge.

Who do you nominate? R Rock And Roll Neil Young Neil Young N NeoGAF
 
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Rock And Roll

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Great question. Drums being my main instrument I have dozens of influences but I'd say Ringo/Hal Blaine/studio guys are really who I modelled my playing after, I try to just lock things down tempo wise and keep a good groove going. The whole gospel chops thing is great for modern drummer festival but if you overplay on gigs most people won't want to work with you unless it's a jazz fusion gig. I've had countless singers tell me they prefer me for gigs because I don't overpower them and I set things up nicely for them, that just comes from taking the approach of the less is more studio players.

Other instruments is a bit of a mixed bag, since I'm not too skilled at any of them I gravitate towards more unorthodox guys, kind of like you were saying with Neil Young. I think McCartney when I play bass for fun, roots are boring and I play enough of that on piano/guitar so I tend to play bass more melodically and view it as almost a counter melody instrument at points.

Guitar would be Elliott Smith. I really like his finger picking style and his playing inspired me to get good at Travis picking. He also does a lot of self accompaniment with walking up to chords with bass lines, I find myself doing that a lot when playing guitar. Why just go from E to A when you can go E F# G# A, or from G to C when you can walk down G F E D C etc...

Piano I try to copy Elton although I'm obviously nowhere close to being as skilled or proficient. But I do like the ways he'll play rhythmically and use inversions to create movement. Also drummers playing piano (Phil Collins, Dennis Wilson) is something I lean towards, again due to the rhythmic ideas and not being technically skilled but making it sound interesting through rhythm/dynamics/simple fills.
 
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Happosai

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Great question. Drums being my main instrument I have dozens of influences but I'd say Ringo/Hal Blaine/studio guys are really who I modelled my playing after, I try to just lock things down tempo wise and keep a good groove going. The whole gospel chops thing is great for modern drummer festival but if you overplay on gigs most people won't want to work with you unless it's a jazz fusion gig. I've had countless singers tell me they prefer me for gigs because I don't overpower them and I set things up nicely for them, that just comes from taking the approach of the less is more studio players.

Other instruments is a bit of a mixed bag, since I'm not too skilled at any of them I gravitate towards more unorthodox guys, kind of like you were saying with Neil Young. I think McCartney when I play bass for fun, roots are boring and I play enough of that on piano/guitar so I tend to play bass more melodically and view it as almost a counter melody instrument at points.

Guitar would be Elliott Smith. I really like his finger picking style and his playing inspired me to get good at Travis picking. He also does a lot of self accompaniment with walking up to chords with bass lines, I find myself doing that a lot when playing guitar. Why just go from E to A when you can go E F# G# A, or from G to C when you can walk down G F E D C etc...

Piano I try to copy Elton although I'm obviously nowhere close to being as skilled or proficient. But I do like the ways he'll play rhythmically and use inversions to create movement. Also drummers playing piano (Phil Collins, Dennis Wilson) is something I lean towards, again due to the rhythmic ideas and not being technically skilled but making it sound interesting through rhythm/dynamics/simple fills.
I guess I only listed my mediocre preference for acoustic guitar.
For basic electric guitar I imitate the playing style of Carlos Santana (I know to some he sounds big but once I learned complex playing from Eric Johnson, Steve Howe, and Mike Oldfield...he became more regular)
For basic bass I always liked Bruce Palmer or Tony Butler
For basic drums prefer the playing of Terry Chambers
Basic piano and key influences are Mark Mothersbaugh and Neil Young
 
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JCK75

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I've been playing and writing for about 30 years now (since I was 15), only since the pandemic started did I pick it back up again and start learning audio production.. I'm very green at recording and mixing but I'm getting better each time I do it. Musically I'm pretty much all Rock but I'm all over the place inside the genre. I do vocals, guitar and bass.. drums I only play when it's simple enough for me (Ramones covers) but I usually program them into Reaper.

Few Covers and Originals I've done recently.




 
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Rock And Roll

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I've been playing and writing for about 30 years now (since I was 15), only since the pandemic started did I pick it back up again and start learning audio production.. I'm very green at recording and mixing but I'm getting better each time I do it. Musically I'm pretty much all Rock but I'm all over the place inside the genre. I do vocals, guitar and bass.. drums I only play when it's simple enough for me (Ramones covers) but I usually program them into Reaper.

Few Covers and Originals I've done recently.





This quarantine has actually worked out pretty well for me in terms of being able to practice more than ever and being able to pick up new skills. Learning how to mix/record over the past year has been a lot of fun. Your original song is really nice too man, keep it up!
 
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GeekyDad

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I'm not a great singer or guitar player. But it's something I've loved throughout the years. And usually when I would get ideas or inspiration, I would lay down some tracks on my 8-track Roland workstation. Most of these tunes were recorded about 15 to 20 years ago:

 

Rock And Roll

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Hey everyone, I thought I'd bump this thread to shamelessly promote my debut single. I've been hard at work over the past year learning production skills and getting my guitar/bass/piano/singing more solid and this is the result of it. Please listen to it a couple thousand times so I can earn a nickel.

 

Kev Kev

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Hey everyone, I thought I'd bump this thread to shamelessly promote my debut single. I've been hard at work over the past year learning production skills and getting my guitar/bass/piano/singing more solid and this is the result of it. Please listen to it a couple thousand times so I can earn a nickel.

sounds great buddy. excellent recording, mixing and mastering! it really sound clean and professional. nice use of the full stereo spectrum, the balance is on point. writing and musicianship is solid. theres some fun little extra stuff like the claps and bongos, little reverb/echo effect. the background vocals toward the end are great.

really good stuff here man. im seriously impressed. keep creating, youre really good at it!!!
 

Rock And Roll

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sounds great buddy. excellent recording, mixing and mastering! it really sound clean and professional. nice use of the full stereo spectrum, the balance is on point. writing and musicianship is solid. theres some fun little extra stuff like the claps and bongos, little reverb/echo effect. the background vocals toward the end are great.

really good stuff here man. im seriously impressed. keep creating, youre really good at it!!!

Thanks a lot man, I really appreciate the kind words! I did everything except the mastering which I got done professionally since I wanted it to sound semi-pro. I've got an albums worth of stuff that needs to be recorded, it's just finding the time to get it all done!