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Dumping iron at sea can bury carbon for centuries, study shows

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Bolshevik

Banned
Wouldn't this cause massive eutrophication?

Reducing CO2 while fucking up all ocean life in that area?

Not really, the life cycle of these organisms is cyclical.

Adding iron would just create higher peaks, but with higher peaks comes more zooplankton that eat the phytoplankton and so on and so on. This technique is a waste of time as of now. There are much better ideas for reducing global warming out there.
 

antonz

Member
Seems like the kind of thinking Humankind would do. Delay the shit for a few decades to centuries so we dont have to worry about it and leave the shit hitting the fan scenario for our kids kids kids
 
Not really, the life cycle of these organisms is cyclical.

Adding iron would just create higher peaks, but with higher peaks comes more zooplankton that eat the phytoplankton and so on and so on. This technique is a waste of time as of now. There are much better ideas for reducing global warming out there.

But... the idea isn't that this, and only this, will remove all excess carbon from the atmosphere, but rather one of many techniques that can be used to address the problem.
 

RedCoyote

Member
Only really works in places that are rich in key nutrients but aren't yielding much growth, iron is a very minor nutrient but sometimes that's the only thing missing. Anyway, the problems are mostly complete unknowns, like what kind of changes or how much of a change. There's also the problem (as some people have mentioned) where oxygen levels in the deep sea might drop due to excessive detritus.

The sequestered carbon is pretty much all calcium carbonate (basically chalk) from the dead plankton. I would say a better idea would be to stimulate calcifying plankton by adding calcium, which could be upwelled from depths above the Carbonate Compensation Depth (where the calcium carbonate dissolves faster than it accumulates). The problem here is whether or not this causes sequestered carbon to be released, as well as all those issues with the iron fertilization regarding messing up ecosystems.
 

iamblades

Member
The most efficient geoengineering to stop global warming is solar radiation management, more specifically statospheric sulfur aerosols. A tiny amount of sulfur in the stratosphere has the potential to drop temperatures by a huge amount.
 

Famassu

Member
No, I mean if humans suddenly switched to vegetarian diets, what would agribusiness do to the environment to accomodate? Law of unforseen consequences and all that. I'm not saying it would be worse, I'm saying different and complex problems might emerge.
Why would it do anything to the environment? We wouldn't need to increase farming as we'd already produce more food than is necessary.
 
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