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Duress
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(11-19-2014, 07:42 PM)
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So do all of you guys have big families? My mother's side, had two brothers and a sister. My father was an only child. We're fairly close family. I guess that goes without saying, with them immigrating.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 07:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Wow, I've heard you talk about how your parents' racism before but it's always very strange to me. I think living in California and being lucky in general has really sheltered me from the kind of Asian == foreigner thinking many seem to describe. And yes, acting American == acting white to many people. I acting like the term acting American, or maybe, acting aculturally (like asexually)?

I grew up in Irvine, with a majority of Asians, and I didn't have any nonAsian friends until college, so I never thought I was a foreigner until I got older and interacted with nonAsians.

I mean, sure, there were always small things that happened, "Asians eat dogs," or "eww chicken feet are gross," or even the persistent notion that Asians did better in school... but none of that actually made me feel like I was different until after I left the bubble.

What does it mean to act white ._.? I used to think that "acting white" meant you did poorly in school and were disrespectful to your parents... and then I realized how racist that idea was. Even in the best ways, using it to describe generalizations like "I'm a bad Asian, I majored in English," perpetuates generalizations that can be harmful because they contribute to a larger, more sinister notion, even if they're not meant to be so individually (I think of #shirtgate for this).

No, I have a lot of friends that are not Chinese and thus don't really know/care about the differences. My few Chinese friends also like me in that they are super-Americanized. I guess I just grew up with people that didn't talk about or care to notice the differences.

?

I'm not saying that you should care about the difference.. just giving you a history and an explanation of maybe why some Taiwanese people might have corrected you, versus your Chinese friends that might not have said anything (also, culturally, Chinese people tend to consider Taiwanese-Chinese to be just Chinese).

Oddly enough, my parents are the ones that told me, it doesn't matter if you're Chinese or Taiwanese, you're in America and not in Taiwan so those politics don't matter. I have a feeling that they were only telling me this because they didn't want me to get involved in Taiwanese politics the way a lot of Taiwan families in the US still are. My mom and dad are very anti-Asia politics, and generally very apolitical.

*edit: I talked to my SO, and I think I get it. What you mean is, it doesn't really matter because the politics are Taiwan/China politics, and since culturally you're American, it really doesn't matter what goes on in other countries or the history of other countries, right? Sorry, I wasn't trying to imply again, that you should care... just thought that since you brought it up, it might be interesting for you to know why some Taiwanese/Chinese people are so... very.. insistent about nomenclature.


I was thinking more about acting white and came to the conclusion that it's actually a way to say "not acting asian." At least for me. When I was a kid, there were groups of asians that pretty much kept to themselves. They only had friends that were their ethnicity. They only spoke in their native tongue. They brought ethnic foods for lunch instead of buying cafeteria food or American lunches.

To me, this was odd, because I didn't like speaking Chinese, didn't like Chinese food, and was friends with everyone. So I didn't act like them and considered myself white-washed, since I didn't belong to their group. Like you said, acting American is probably a better way to put it.

To this day I do notice that there are still groups of Asians that stick to their own closed off social groups and kind of do "Asian" things together all the time. It makes me a bit uncomfortable because I don't really belong, but I try not to look down on them as my younger self would have. It's a strange problem, being uncomfortable around groups of members of your own race.

Yeah, there are groups of Asians that either are direct immigrants and gravitate towards others that speak their language/share their customs (think expat groups in foreign countries).. there are also groups of Asians that may have been born here but are much more familiar with their parents' cultures.

My immediate friend group is Asian, though we gave up on using Chinese a long time ago, with some exceptions of phrases. We're all Asian-Americans, and I guess we do Asian things like get boba and have potlucks/BBQs/dinners, but I'm not really sure if that's what you mean by doing "Asian" things.

I think, within even Asians in America/out of country, there are a lot of different stages of assimilation and/or cultural tradition.

Funnily enough, my cousins in Minnesota remind me a lot of you, as well as my ex-bf from college (Chinese Canadian). Large groups of Asians made them really uncomfortable. It was hilarious to me, until I went to Texas and started to become conscious of the fact that I was the only Asian face in the entire room! No one singled me out or did anything to make me feel unsafe or unwelcome... but once you're conscious of it.. it's just kinda hard to turn off.

I guess it's just the natural reaction to groups of people that look different than what you're used to (which would also, interestingly enough, explain why Asian FOBS tend to hang out with other Asian FOBS).

Originally Posted by Toki767

That Ng in his name is just to throw us off.

Yep. Burn the pretender! /pitchfork

I ONLY SERVE THE TRUE WARCHIEF OF THE HORDE.
Last edited by backslashbunny; 11-19-2014 at 08:08 PM.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 07:55 PM)
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Originally Posted by Duress

So do all of you guys have big families? My mother's side, had two brothers and a sister. My father was an only child. We're fairly close family. I guess that goes without saying, with them immigrating.

Both my father and mother have 5 siblings each, so I have like 30+ cousins by my last count. Not even sure how many nephews/nieces I have anymore. Cousin's children are considered nephew/niece right? At least I think they are in Asian culture. I think the Western way is like second cousin or whatever.
Josh with a J
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(11-19-2014, 08:03 PM)
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Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I ONLY SERVE THE TRUE WARCHIEF OF THE HORDE.

You need to crossover
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:09 PM)
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Originally Posted by Lesath

I like to think that we have the luxury to choose which aspects of each culture we would like to adapt. A lot of Americans find the sort of devotion I have to my family somewhat strange, and likewise, a lot of Asians find my uncompromising criticism towards their cultural norms and my directness uncomfortable.

Also, anyone else find it sort of funny how we get along better than actual Asians do?

It is a pretty fantastic luxury to be able to build our own culture instead of being beholden to a single one. Funnily enough, same goes for me not being religious. I've heard horror stories of people marrying into Catholic families (both Asian and non-Asian).

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I grew up in Irvine, with a majority of Asians, and I didn't have any nonAsian friends until college, so I never thought I was a foreigner until I got older and interacted with nonAsians.

I mean, sure, there were always small things that happened, "Asians eat dogs," or "eww chicken feet are gross," or even the persistent notion that Asians did better in school... but none of that actually made me feel like I was different until after I left the bubble.

In college I met a girl from Boston who had never been around Asians. She assumed all Asians spoke Oriental. I convinced her that all the Asians on the floor went out every midnight to practice kung-fu on the roof. To be fair, the fortune cookie boxers (a gag gift!) and katana (Highlander sword, so technically not Asian or only Asian in a roundabout way!) I was holding probably sold the lie.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

What does it mean to act white ._.? I used to think that "acting white" meant you did poorly in school and were disrespectful to your parents... and then I realized how racist that idea was. Even in the best ways, using it to describe generalizations like "I'm a bad Asian, I majored in English," perpetuates generalizations that can be harmful because they contribute to a larger, more sinister notion, even if they're not meant to be so individually (I think of #shirtgate for this).

I agree that using the term to describe not matching a standard is harmful. In my case, it was used to not associate with something I didn't like, which is also harmful. Still, I think the way I use it now is pretty harmless, although Americanized is probably better. Though in your case, that could also be an insult.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I'm not saying that you should care about the difference.. just giving you a history and an explanation of maybe why some Taiwanese people might have corrected you, versus your Chinese friends that might not have said anything (also, culturally, Chinese people tend to consider Taiwanese-Chinese to be just Chinese).

Oddly enough, my parents are the ones that told me, it doesn't matter if you're Chinese or Taiwanese, you're in America and not in Taiwan so those politics don't matter. I have a feeling that they were only telling me this because they didn't want me to get involved in Taiwanese politics the way a lot of Taiwan families in the US still are. My mom and dad are very anti-Asia politics, and generally very apolitical.

Oh yeah, I know now that a lot of people care deeply about this sort of thing. I'm just not one of them and neither is anyone I'm close with. My parents are also very apolitical as far as I know. I actually don't talk to them about anything serious so who knows, maybe they really do care!

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

Yeah, there are groups of Asians that either are direct immigrants and gravitate towards others that speak their language/share their customs (think expat groups in foreign countries).. there are also groups of Asians that may have been born here but are much more familiar with their parents' cultures.

My immediate friend group is Asian, though we gave up on using Chinese a long time ago, with some exceptions of phrases. We're all Asian-Americans, and I guess we do Asian things like get boba and have potlucks/BBQs/dinners, but I'm not really sure if that's what you mean by doing "Asian" things.

I think, within even Asians in America/out of country, there are a lot of different stages of assimilation and/or cultural tradition.

Funnily enough, my cousins in Minnesota remind me a lot of you, as well as my ex-bf from college (Chinese Canadian). Large groups of Asians made them really uncomfortable. It was hilarious to me, until I went to Texas and started to become conscious of the fact that I was the only Asian face in the entire room! No one singled me out or did anything to make me feel unsafe or unwelcome... but once you're conscious of it.. it's just kinda hard to turn off.

Yeah I understand why certain groups would feel more comfortable with members of their own ethnicity. I used to think that was weird and kind of look down on that kind of behavior, but have gotten better about it with age. It's really just groups of Chinese people that are super Chinese (FOBs) that make me nervous. I think it's because they make me acutely aware of how not Chinese I act, if that makes any sense. Like I presume that they judge me for that.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I guess it's just the natural reaction to groups of people that look different than what you're used to (which would also, interestingly enough, explain why Asian FOBS tend to hang out with other Asian FOBS).

FOBs (Fresh Off Boat) are another strange phenomenon that I think is worth discussing. Funnily enough, I've only heard the term apply to Chinese/Taiwanese people by other Chinese/Taiwanese people. And it's changed a bit since when I was a kid. I used to be that FOBS were poor immigrants that stuck to themselves, which is pretty messed up.

Now it's the rich ones that dress super fancy and always drink boba (guilty of this). Or maybe that's because I'm now an adult and that's the kind of FOB I meet.
Last edited by CapNBritain; 11-19-2014 at 08:11 PM. Reason: speeling
jasonng
Member
(11-19-2014, 08:15 PM)

Originally Posted by Esch

Lmao

You are asian though, I can tell.

Can you though?

My ethnicity gets mistaken A LOT even from other Asians. I've been told I looked Korean a lot. I've heard Japanese, Taiwanese, Vietnamese, even was told I must be mixed and half white because there's no way I'm full Asian. I guess I have an ambiguous Asian look? I'm just Chinese.


Edit: I should probably say an ambiguous East Asian look.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:17 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

FOBs (Fresh Off Boat) are another strange phenomenon that I think is worth discussing. Funnily enough, I've only heard the term apply to Chinese/Taiwanese people by other Chinese/Taiwanese people. And it's changed a bit since when I was a kid. I used to be that FOBS were poor immigrants that stuck to themselves, which is pretty messed up.

Now it's the rich ones that dress super fancy and always drink boba (guilty of this). Or maybe that's because I'm now an adult and that's the kind of FOB I meet.

Now that you mention it, I actually haven't heard the term applied by anyone that wasn't Chinese. I'm fairly sure the term is used for Asians in general though I never hear non-Chinese Asian people use it.
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:18 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

Both my father and mother have 5 siblings each, so I have like 30+ cousins by my last count. Not even sure how many nephews/nieces I have anymore. Cousin's children are considered nephew/niece right? At least I think they are in Asian culture. I think the Western way is like second cousin or whatever.

I am the only son of the only son of the only son. Small ass family. Even though I'm not a fan of my last name I can't change it without shaming my ancestors though, because I'm all that's left. Are Asians traditionally know for having large families? I guess it depends on the type of Asian...

Originally Posted by jasonng

Can you though?

My ethnicity gets mistaken A LOT even from other Asians. I've been told I looked Korean a lot. I've heard Japanese, Taiwanese, Vietnamese, even was told I must be mixed and half white because there's no way I'm full Asian. I guess I have an ambiguous Asian look? I'm just Chinese.

High five for ambiguous Asian despite full Chinese.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 08:19 PM)
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@CapNBritain - you know, it's awesome (and interesting!) that you and I only live 45 miles away from each other, and yet have had such different experiences as Asian-Americans.

If it makes you feel better, I just assume everyone is judging me. :)

BTW, anyone read this thread yet?
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost...34&postcount=1

Most of the comments are about what the guy said to the black family, so I didn't want to be like wow he was racist against that Asian lady too.

BUT SERIOUSLY. ASKING A NEWS REPORTER IF SHE EVEN SPEAKS ENGLISH... WHILE SHE IS QUESTIONING YOU IN ENGLISH?

http://www.wdrb.com/story/15473169/v...anchorreporter

This is the reporter in question-

She joined WDRB in June of 2001 and currently co-anchors WDRB News @ 11:30. For more than six years, she anchored the weekends. Previously, she worked as a weekend anchor in Duluth, Minnesota; Austin, Minnesota; and Columbia, Missouri.

She's a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism, and is also an active member of the Asian American Journalists Association. She grew up in Beaverton, Oregon.

Her favorite stories include sky diving at 13,500 feet with the U.S. Army Parachute Team, the Golden Knights and traveling to Ethiopia to cover a local church's mission work. Valerie, her husband, their three children and their long haired Chihuahua love living in Louisville.

It's not like she actually was an immigrant or had ANY reason at all to be questioned about English proficiency. Ugh.

This isn't even the first time I've heard this sort of shit. Half the people that say this kind of stuff are pretty much illiterate themselves. Ignorant asshole.

*edit: Bonus irony- the idiot can't speak proper English himself. Ugh.
Last edited by backslashbunny; 11-19-2014 at 08:24 PM.
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 08:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by jasonng

Can you though?

My ethnicity gets mistaken A LOT even from other Asians. I've been told I looked Korean a lot. I've heard Japanese, Taiwanese, Vietnamese, even was told I must be mixed and half white because there's no way I'm full Asian. I guess I have an ambiguous Asian look? I'm just Chinese..

Well I have no idea what you look like but yeah, the sarcasm, the username, etc.
Zoe
(11-19-2014, 08:20 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

Now that you mention it, I actually haven't heard the term applied by anyone that wasn't Chinese. I'm fairly sure the term is used for Asians in general though I never hear non-Chinese Asian people use it.

Are the groups prominent in your area? There are tons of Vietnamese here, so I have heard the term used on them.

Then again, one of the Vietnamese guys I know literally did come off the boat when he was a child.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:21 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zoe

Are the groups prominent in your area? There are tons of Vietnamese here, so I have heard the term used on them.

Then again, one of the Vietnamese guys I know literally did come off the boat when he was a child.

I'm in San Francisco, so maybe other groups aren't super prominent. It doesn't help that most of the Vietnamese people here are half Chinese so I'm not sure that counts.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 08:26 PM)
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I think "fob" is just easier to say than "immigrant." Same with ABC.. it's just convenient.

That being said, I doubt anyone has come over on a boat. Now that's just stuff we ship over from Asia (I would know, I used to work in that field. GODDAMN BOATS ALWAYS MAKING MY ORDERS LATE.)

Not sure if "fob" is a bad thing anymore. At least, over here, it's not if used when describing an immigrant-- fob also specifies that it's an Asian immigrant, though I suppose that could be bad?

I don't know. Do y'all think it's not a good word to be using anymore?
ActStriker
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(11-19-2014, 08:28 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

High five for ambiguous Asian despite full Chinese.

It's always interesting to go to a Korean or Japanese business and they start speaking in Korean/Japanese to you, and you look at them dumbfounded for a bit.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I think "fob" is just easier to say than "immigrant." Same with ABC.. it's just convenient.

That being said, I doubt anyone has come over on a boat. Now that's just stuff we ship over from Asia (I would know, I used to work in that field. GODDAMN BOATS ALWAYS MAKING MY ORDERS LATE.)

Not sure if "fob" is a bad thing anymore. At least, over here, it's not if used when describing an immigrant-- fob also specifies that it's an Asian immigrant, though I suppose that could be bad?

I don't know. Do y'all think it's not a good word to be using anymore?

It kind of depends. if it's an Asian saying it about another Asian, then people would get it. Go outside the bubble and I think you see where people can get their feathers rustled.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by ActStriker

It's always interesting to go to a Korean or Japanese business and they start speaking in Korean/Japanese to you, and you look at them dumbfounded for a bit.

To be fair, I go to Chinese restaurants and the same thing happens there since the majority here speak Cantonese and not Mandarin. :P
ActStriker
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(11-19-2014, 08:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

To be fair, I go to Chinese restaurants and the same thing happens there since the majority here speak Cantonese and not Mandarin. :P

But at least you can talk in Mandarin and odds are they can understand you
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 08:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by backslashbunny

I think "fob" is just easier to say than "immigrant." Same with ABC.. it's just convenient.

That being said, I doubt anyone has come over on a boat. Now that's just stuff we ship over from Asia (I would know, I used to work in that field. GODDAMN BOATS ALWAYS MAKING MY ORDERS LATE.)

Not sure if "fob" is a bad thing anymore. At least, over here, it's not if used when describing an immigrant-- fob also specifies that it's an Asian immigrant, though I suppose that could be bad?

I don't know. Do y'all think it's not a good word to be using anymore?

I don't know if it's an inherently bad word, but sometimes people can use it as part of an insult, kind of like how there's nothing wrong with the word jew but in the wrong context and delivery you can sound pretty bad.
Kevyt
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(11-19-2014, 08:32 PM)
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Hello Asian-Gaf! How's it going?
Last edited by Kevyt; 11-19-2014 at 08:34 PM.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 08:33 PM)
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Originally Posted by ActStriker

It's always interesting to go to a Korean or Japanese business and they start speaking in Korean/Japanese to you, and you look at them dumbfounded for a bit.

It kind of depends. if it's an Asian saying it about another Asian, then people would get it. Go outside the bubble and I think you see where people can get their feathers rustled.

I wonder if this is like black people and the n word.

Was fob used to dehumanize Asians in America/elsewhere at one point? I mean, I think everyone knows about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the way Asians were treated on the railroads, during WW2, and even during the Vietnam War... but I'm not sure if FOB was used.

Originally Posted by Toki767

To be fair, I go to Chinese restaurants and the same thing happens there since the majority here speak Cantonese and not Mandarin. :P

Same.

Even in places that speak Mandarin, unless I've been there a few times, I always just speak English to them. I know there's this idea that if you speak "their" language, you get better service, but I don't know if that's true. It might make communication easier initially, but .. that's about it.

Though, every time I go somewhere that only has a Chinese menu... I freak out. Or places where I ask for a fork and they look at me like I'm insane.

I don't use cheap chopsticks. Sorry.
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:33 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

Now that you mention it, I actually haven't heard the term applied by anyone that wasn't Chinese. I'm fairly sure the term is used for Asians in general though I never hear non-Chinese Asian people use it.

Yep, I only hear it from Chinese trying to distance themselves from other Chinese acting too Chinese. I'm guilty of this.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

@CapNBritain - you know, it's awesome (and interesting!) that you and I only live 45 miles away from each other, and yet have had such different experiences as Asian-Americans.

If it makes you feel better, I just assume everyone is judging me. :)

BTW, anyone read this thread yet?
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost...34&postcount=1

Most of the comments are about what the guy said to the black family, so I didn't want to be like wow he was racist against that Asian lady too.

BUT SERIOUSLY. ASKING A NEWS REPORTER IF SHE EVEN SPEAKS ENGLISH... WHILE SHE IS QUESTIONING YOU IN ENGLISH?

http://www.wdrb.com/story/15473169/v...anchorreporter

This is the reporter in question-



It's not like she actually was an immigrant or had ANY reason at all to be questioned about English proficiency. Ugh.

This isn't even the first time I've heard this sort of shit. Half the people that say this kind of stuff are pretty much illiterate themselves. Ignorant asshole.

*edit: Bonus irony- the idiot can't speak proper English himself. Ugh.

It speaks to my privilege that I find this hilarious. I mean sure, I know that the racism is terrible, but the idea that there are people this ignorant and stupid out there just makes me laugh. Probably because I've never been personally affected by it.

Originally Posted by Zoe

Are the groups prominent in your area? There are tons of Vietnamese here, so I have heard the term used on them.

Then again, one of the Vietnamese guys I know literally did come off the boat when he was a child.

Interesting, never heard a Vietnamese person use it before. Also, as I alluded to before, I feel that the meaning has changed among the people I know. FOP (first of plane) would be more appropriate. In fact, it probably refers more to the Chinese equivalent of yuppies.
Zoe
(11-19-2014, 08:38 PM)
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Originally Posted by backslashbunny

That being said, I doubt anyone has come over on a boat. Now that's just stuff we ship over from Asia (I would know, I used to work in that field. GODDAMN BOATS ALWAYS MAKING MY ORDERS LATE.)

They could have if they were old enough!

Of course times are different now. This all would have been around 30 years ago for my friend.

Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Interesting, never heard a Vietnamese person use it before. Also, as I alluded to before, I feel that the meaning has changed among the people I know. FOP (first of plane) would be more appropriate. In fact, it probably refers more to the Chinese equivalent of yuppies.

Around here it doesn't have the yuppie connotation at all--just obviously immigrant.
Last edited by Zoe; 11-19-2014 at 08:41 PM.
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 08:38 PM)
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nah the use of the term fob / fobby is pretty common in south asian communities in my experience too, and i've even heard some eastern europeans and nigerians throw it around.

it's just a general term for someone new to the country who stands out in their unacclimated mannerisms, speech, conduct.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:39 PM)
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Originally Posted by backslashbunny

Same.

Even in places that speak Mandarin, unless I've been there a few times, I always just speak English to them. I know there's this idea that if you speak "their" language, you get better service, but I don't know if that's true. It might make communication easier initially, but .. that's about it.

Though, every time I go somewhere that only has a Chinese menu... I freak out. Or places where I ask for a fork and they look at me like I'm insane.

I don't use cheap chopsticks. Sorry.

With Chinese restaurants it's always hard to say. Some give you better service if you speak Chinese, but quite a few will give you better service if you speak in English.

For the most part I've gotten used to basically only speaking Chinese when asked for how many people are in my party, ordering specific dishes that have silly English translated names, asking for a box, and asking for the check. Everything else I'll just use English.
Kevyt
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(11-19-2014, 08:42 PM)
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Vietnamese cuisine is one of the best. I don't mean to start a food debate but Pho noodles are the best noodles ever. No other kind of noodles come close. The texture, the smell, the technique, and way in which the noodles are cooked is simply sublime.
Last edited by Kevyt; 11-19-2014 at 08:49 PM.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 08:44 PM)
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Originally Posted by leonidas.

Vietnamese cuisine is one of the best. I don't mean to start a food debate but Pho noodles are the best noodles ever. No other kind of noodles come close. The texture, the smell, the technique, and way in which the noodles are cooked is simply... sublime.

Have to disagree. I think ramen is GOAT, and I'm Taiwanese. Sorry beef noodle soup... I still prefer pork over beef!



Even dipping ramen is AMAZING.



Oddly enough, despite living in OC and having access to amazing Vietnamese food, I don't actually like Vietnamese food at all ._.

My favorite Asian cuisine is definitely Japanese. :x
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:46 PM)
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Originally Posted by ActStriker

It kind of depends. if it's an Asian saying it about another Asian, then people would get it. Go outside the bubble and I think you see where people can get their feathers rustled.

I always thought that it was just Americanized Chinese saying it to put down non-Americanized Chinese. So it would be Chinese on Chinese aggression, if anything.

Originally Posted by Esch

I don't know if it's an inherently bad word, but sometimes people can use it as part of an insult, kind of like how there's nothing wrong with the word jew but in the wrong context and delivery you can sound pretty bad.

Yeah, how a person uses it can be important. Although I don't think I've ever heard someone use it as an outright insult.

Originally Posted by Zoe

They could have if they were old enough!

Of course times are different now. This all would have been around 30 years ago for my friend.

Around here it doesn't have the yuppie connotation at all--just obviously immigrant.

Where are you located, if you don't mind me asking?

Originally Posted by Esch

nah the use of the term fob / fobby is pretty common in south asian communities in my experience too, and i've even heard some eastern europeans and nigerians throw it around.

it's just a general term for someone new to the country who stands out in their unacclimated mannerisms, speech, conduct.

This is pretty fascinating. Never knew non-Chinese, let alone non-Asians used the term.

Maybe the yuppie and cliquish connotations are unique to the Chinese communities that I have observed in California? Although since i'm not really a part of those communities, I guess it's all just conjecture on my part.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:46 PM)
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Originally Posted by leonidas.

Vietnamese cuisine is one of the best. I don't mean to start a food debate but Pho noodles are the best noodles ever. No other kind of noodles come close. The texture, the smell, the technique, and way in which the noodles are cooked is simply... sublime.

Much as I like pho, ramen is superior. Plus with pho I'm always hungry after 2-3 hours later.
ActStriker
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(11-19-2014, 08:47 PM)
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Correctly cooked ramen is some of the best because of its chewiness and its texture. Pho is great, but rice noodles can't match that.

Originally Posted by CapNBritain

I always thought that it was just Americanized Chinese saying it to put down non-Americanized Chinese. So it would be Chinese on Chinese aggression, if anything.

Yeah, that's part of it too. I think it's dependent on who says it.

I could be wrong about it, tho
Last edited by ActStriker; 11-19-2014 at 08:50 PM.
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:50 PM)
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Originally Posted by leonidas.

Vietnamese cuisine is one of the best. I don't mean to start a food debate but Pho noodles are the best noodles ever. No other kind of noodles come close. The texture, the smell, the technique, and way in which the noodles are cooked is simply... sublime.

Mmm.. Pho is pretty amazing. Maybe you're-

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

Have to disagree. I think ramen is GOAT, and I'm Taiwanese. Sorry beef noodle soup... I still prefer pork over beef!



Even dipping ramen is AMAZING.



Oddly enough, despite living in OC and having access to amazing Vietnamese food, I don't actually like Vietnamese food at all ._.

My favorite Asian cuisine is definitely Japanese. :x

YES.

This thread is now about food. Begun, the noodle wars has.

Santouka and Daikokuya for life. Even ramen places in Japan have a hard time keeping up.

And for everyone sleeping on the awesome-ness that is Uni, just give it a shot. Eventually you'll get it and ascend to god-tier food snobbery.
Zoe
(11-19-2014, 08:54 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Where are you located, if you don't mind me asking?

Texas
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:55 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

YES.

This thread is now about food. Begun, the noodle wars has.

Santouka and Daikokuya for life. Even ramen places in Japan have a hard time keeping up.

And for everyone sleeping on the awesome-ness that is Uni, just give it a shot. Eventually you'll get it and ascend to god-tier food snobbery.

I have to drive like 40 miles from San Francisco to San Jose just to eat at Santouka. I still do it every once in a while. Luckily lots of ramen places in the bay area are popping up over the years. I also like Yamadaya Ramen as well. I wish there were a Mitsuwa Marketplace closer to my city.
ActStriker
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(11-19-2014, 08:57 PM)
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Always have a place for chow mein



Favorite food growing up
Kevyt
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(11-19-2014, 08:58 PM)
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You haven't lived life if you never had home made Pho, made the way it's meant to be eaten. I'm not talking about going to a Pho restaurant (although there are some real good ones). My Vietnamese brothers and sisters would understand. Let the noodle wars begin!! :P
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 08:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zoe

Texas

Oh yeah I've heard there are a lot of Vietnamese there. I now change my theory of Chinese Christmas to a Vietnamese grinch, whom other Texans mistook for Chinese.

Originally Posted by Toki767

I have to drive like 40 miles from San Francisco to San Jose just to eat at Santouka. I still do it every once in a while. Luckily lots of ramen places in the bay area are popping up over the years. I also like Yamadaya Ramen as well. I wish there were a Mitsuwa Marketplace closer to my city.

I've been to the Mitsuwa Marketplace in San Jose around lunch time before. It was horrifying. There have been a crapton of Ramen places opening up in LA too, but most range from mediocre to acceptable.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 08:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by ActStriker

Always have a place for chow mein



Favorite food growing up

HK style pan fried is basically the only version of chow mein I'll eat. Need that crispy goodness. I also do like yee mein though.
backslashbunny
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(11-19-2014, 08:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Mmm.. Pho is pretty amazing. Maybe you're-



YES.

This thread is now about food. Begun, the noodle wars has.

Santouka and Daikokuya for life. Even ramen places in Japan have a hard time keeping up.

And for everyone sleeping on the awesome-ness that is Uni, just give it a shot. Eventually you'll get it and ascend to god-tier food snobbery.

Uni is amazing, and if you live in so-cal, I think you just automatically become a god-tier food snob.

(BTW, if you're ever in the OC, try Nana-San. The omakase there... holy shit. Also, their uni is delicious, though I feel like there's really good uni in SD too.)

I love Daikokuya with all my heart and soul, but for dipping ramen, I only had Tsujita. That was my first introduction, and WOW.

Originally Posted by Toki767

I have to drive like 40 miles from San Francisco to San Jose just to eat at Santouka. I still do it every once in a while. Luckily lots of ramen places in the bay area are popping up over the years. I also like Yamadaya Ramen as well. I wish there were a Mitsuwa Marketplace closer to my city.

I live near two Mitsuwas and TWO Daisos.. na na na na na.

SF is pretty legit food, though I secretly/not so secretly think LA's Asian food is better :P.
ActStriker
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(11-19-2014, 09:01 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

HK style pan fried is basically the only version of chow mein I'll eat. Need that crispy goodness. I also do like yee mein though.

Pretty much. Only Canto places do it right though
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 09:01 PM)
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all asian food is good y'all

yes, all of it.
Kevyt
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(11-19-2014, 09:03 PM)
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Originally Posted by Esch

all asian food is good y'all

yes, all of it.

And here I was wanting to get into a vicious fistfight about food, using a coat hanger if necessary.
Brakke
(11-19-2014, 09:07 PM)
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I am a white dude. I came up in Orange County and pretty much only had two white friends from elementary school until I left for college. My high school class graduated like 23 Kims and 18 Lees or something like that :D
Firemind
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(11-19-2014, 09:08 PM)
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Ramen is disgusting.

Wonton noodle soup is GOAT.

Last edited by Firemind; 11-19-2014 at 09:28 PM. Reason: oops that's big
CapNBritain
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(11-19-2014, 09:08 PM)
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Originally Posted by leonidas.

You haven't lived life if you never had home made Pho, made the way it's meant to be eaten. I'm not talking about going to a Pho restaurant (although there are some real good ones). My Vietnamese brothers and sisters would understand. Let the noodle wars begin!! :P

Pho is to Ramen as Union Jack to Captain Britain. Powerless against a golden god.

Originally Posted by Toki767

HK style pan fried is basically the only version of chow mein I'll eat. Need that crispy goodness. I also do like yee mein though.

Originally Posted by backslashbunny

Uni is amazing, and if you live in so-cal, I think you just automatically become a god-tier food snob.

(BTW, if you're ever in the OC, try Nana-San. The omakase there... holy shit. Also, their uni is delicious, though I feel like there's really good uni in SD too.)

I love Daikokuya with all my heart and soul, but for dipping ramen, I only had Tsujita. That was my first introduction, and WOW.

I live near two Mitsuwas and TWO Daisos.. na na na na na.

SF is pretty legit food, though I secretly/not so secretly think LA's Asian food is better :P.

Will definitely try Nana-San. Have you tried Maruhide Uni Club in Torrance?

Two Mitsuwas and two Daisos. Man was not meant to soar so close to the sun.

As for LA vs SF, I actually don't have a lot of experience with SF food. But I will say that the actual city of LA has mediocre and/or overpriced Asian food. You gotta go out to the East and South to get the real goods.
Tence
(11-19-2014, 09:10 PM)
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Originally Posted by Esch

all asian food is good y'all

Bet you never tried bakso from Indonesia.
Zoe
(11-19-2014, 09:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Oh yeah I've heard there are a lot of Vietnamese there. I now change my theory of Chinese Christmas to a Vietnamese grinch, whom other Texans mistook for Chinese.

Now are we talking about Vietnamese Vietnamese or Chinese Vietnamese?

I can't tell the difference even though one of my friends gets insulted if you assume he's the latter... >_>
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 09:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by CapNBritain

Will definitely try Nana-San. Have you tried Maruhide Uni Club in Torrance?

Two Mitsuwas and two Daisos. Man was not meant to soar so close to the sun.

As for LA vs SF, I actually don't have a lot of experience with SF food. But I will say that the actual city of LA has mediocre and/or overpriced Asian food. You gotta go out to the East and South to get the real goods.

Same thing with SF really. SF does have some really good Asian food, but the better stuff is a bit more down south between San Francisco and San Jose.
Szu
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(11-19-2014, 09:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by leonidas.

And here I was wanting to get into a vicious fistfight about food, using a coat hanger if necessary.

Slowly puts down round wooden folding chair.
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 09:13 PM)
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Originally Posted by Tence

Bet you never tried bakso from Indonesia.

You would be wrong.

the texture is a little weird, but it's not bad.
Toki767
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(11-19-2014, 09:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by Esch

all asian food is good y'all

yes, all of it.

I could probably go without durian.
Lesath
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(11-19-2014, 09:20 PM)
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Originally Posted by Toki767

Same thing with SF really. SF does have some really good Asian food, but the better stuff is a bit more down south between San Francisco and San Jose.

With regards to dim sum, there are places scattered around SF that I would argue are at least measurable to the quality you'd find in HK and China (though, it varies depending on which chef prepares it a given day). Sushi quality around here isn't too bad, although I could really use a good ramen place.
Esch
Once got into a vicious fistfight with a coat hanger
(11-19-2014, 09:22 PM)
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Well I guess I meant that all styles or cuisines of asian food are good. I haven't found one I've wholly disliked yet.

Some of the smaller countries that are near cultural powerhouses can be a bit underwhelming though, because a lot of their food feels pretty similar to or a combination of stuff I've had already.

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